README: Explain that there are no incremental backups.
authorAndre Noll <maan@tuebingen.mpg.de>
Wed, 16 Dec 2015 13:52:54 +0000 (14:52 +0100)
committerAndre Noll <maan@tuebingen.mpg.de>
Thu, 17 Dec 2015 16:11:55 +0000 (17:11 +0100)
This was unclear to an admin who had used dss for several years! So
maybe it is a good idea to explain the idea behind hardlink-based
backups a bit more.

This commit adds two new sentences to README, one for the admin and
another one for the user.

README

diff --git a/README b/README
index 5cc2914..c5abb29 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -4,14 +4,17 @@ or local host using rsync's link-dest feature.
 dss is admin friendly: It is easy to configure and needs little
 attention once configured to run in daemon mode. It keeps track of
 the available disk space and removes snapshots if disk space becomes
-sparse or snapshots become older than the specified time.
+sparse or snapshots become older than the specified time. Also, due
+to the hardlink-based approach, there is only one type of backup.
+Hence no full, incremental or differential backups need to be
+configured, and there is no database to maintain.
 
 dss is also user-friendly because users can browse the snapshot
 directories without admin intervention and see the contents of the file
-system at the various times a snapshot was taken. In particular, users
-can easily restore accidentally removed files by using their favorite
-file browser to simply copy files from the snapshot directory back
-to the live system.
+system at the various times a snapshot was taken. Each snaphot looks
+like a full backup, so users can easily restore accidentally removed
+files by using their favorite file browser to simply copy files from
+the snapshot directory back to the live system.
 
 dss gives your data an additional level of security besides the usual
 tape-based backups: If the file server goes down and all data is lost