dss.ggo: Minor documentation improvements.
authorAndre Noll <maan@systemlinux.org>
Fri, 21 Mar 2008 22:59:20 +0000 (23:59 +0100)
committerAndre Noll <maan@systemlinux.org>
Fri, 21 Mar 2008 22:59:20 +0000 (23:59 +0100)
dss.ggo

diff --git a/dss.ggo b/dss.ggo
index 171142e..6e222d2 100644 (file)
--- a/dss.ggo
+++ b/dss.ggo
@@ -29,9 +29,6 @@ details="
        file override any options that were previously given at the
        command line. This allows to change the configuration of a
        running dss process on the fly by sending SIGHUP.
-
-       Note that it is not possible to change whether dss runs as
-       background daemon by sending SIGHUP.
 "
 
 option "daemon" d
@@ -43,6 +40,9 @@ details="
        Note that dss refuses to start in daemon mode if no logfile
        was specified. This option is mostly useful in conjuction
        with the -R option described below.
+
+       Note that it is not possible to change whether dss runs as
+       background daemon by sending SIGHUP.
 "
 
 option "dry-run" D
@@ -66,7 +66,7 @@ int typestr="level"
 default="3"
 optional
 details="
-       Lower values mean less verbose logging.
+       Lower values mean more verbose logging.
 "
 
 option "logfile" -
@@ -82,8 +82,9 @@ details="
 defgroup "command"
 #=================
 groupdesc="
-       dss supports a couple of commands each of which corresponds to a different
-       command line option. Exactly one of these options must be given.
+       dss supports a couple of commands each of which corresponds
+       to a different command line option. Exactly one of these
+       options must be given.
 "
 required
 
@@ -92,9 +93,10 @@ groupoption "create" C
 "Create a new snapshot"
 group="command"
 details="
-       Execute the rsync command to create a new snapshot. Note that this
-       command does not care about free disk space.
+       Execute the rsync command to create a new snapshot. Note that
+       this command does not care about free disk space.
 "
+
 groupoption "prune" P
 #~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 "Remove a redundant snapshot"
@@ -203,29 +205,21 @@ int typestr="days"
 default="4"
 optional
 details="
-       dss snapshot aging is implemented in terms of intervals. There are
-       two command line options related to intervals: the duration of a
-       \"unit\" interval and the number of those unit intervals.
-
-       dss removes any snapshots older than the given number of intervals
-       times the duration of a unit interval and tries to keep the following
-       number of snapshots per interval:
-
-               interval number         number of snapshots
-               ===============================================
-               0                       2 ^ (num-intervals - 1)
-               1                       2 ^ (num-intervals - 2)
-               2                       2 ^ (num-intervals - 3)
-               ...
-               num-intervals - 2                       2
-               num-intervals - 1                       1
-               num-intervals                           0
-
-       In other words, the oldest snapshot will at most be unit_interval *
-       num_intervals old (= 5 days * 4 = 20 days if default values are used).
-       Moreover, there are at most 2^num_intervals - 1 snapshots in total
-       (i. e. 31 by default).  Observe that you have to create at least
-       2 ^ (num_intervals - 1) snapshots each interval for this to work out.
+       dss snapshot aging is implemented in terms of intervals. There
+       are two command line options related to intervals: the
+       duration u of a \"unit\" interval and the number n of those
+       unit intervals.
+
+       dss removes any snapshots older than n times u and tries to
+       keep 2^(k-1) snapshots in interval k, where the interval number
+       k counts from zero, zero being the most recent unit interval.
+
+       In other words, the oldest snapshot will at most be u * n days
+       (= 20 days if default values are used) old.  Moreover, there
+       are at most 2^n - 1 snapshots in total (i. e. 31 by default).
+       Observe that you have to create at least 2 ^ (n - 1) snapshots
+       each interval for this to work out because that is the number
+       of snapshots in interval zero.
 "
 
 option "num-intervals" n