small changes here and there
[synmut.git] / bib.bib
diff --git a/bib.bib b/bib.bib
index 19abc26..2fe472a 100644 (file)
--- a/bib.bib
+++ b/bib.bib
@@ -4,14 +4,12 @@
        volume = {108},
        url = {http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=3078368&tool=pmcentrez&rendertype=abstract},
        doi = {10.1073/pnas.1102036108},
-       abstract = {{HIV} adaptation to a host in chronic infection is simulated by means of a Monte-Carlo algorithm that includes the evolutionary factors of mutation, positive selection with varying strength among sites, random genetic drift, linkage, and recombination. By comparing two sensitive measures of linkage disequilibrium {(LD)} and the number of diverse sites measured in simulation to patient data from one-time samples of pol gene obtained by single-genome sequencing from representative untreated patients, we estimate the effective recombination rate and the average selection coefficient to be on the order of 1\% per genome per generation (10(-5) per base per generation) and 0.5\%, respectively. The adaptation rate is twofold higher and fourfold lower than predicted in the absence of recombination and in the limit of very frequent recombination, respectively. The level of {LD} and the number of diverse sites observed in data also range between the values predicted in simulation for these two limiting cases. These results demonstrate the critical importance of finite population size, linkage, and recombination in {HIV} evolution.},
        number = {14},
        journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
        author = {Batorsky, Rebecca and Kearney, Mary F and Palmer, Sarah E and Maldarelli, Frank and Rouzine, Igor M and Coffin, John M},
        month = apr,
        year = {2011},
        pages = {5661--6},
-       file = {Batorsky et al_2011_Estimate of effective recombination rate and average selection coefficient for.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/H3TUFTGA/Batorsky et al_2011_Estimate of effective recombination rate and average selection coefficient for.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{bunnik_autologous_2008,
@@ -25,7 +23,6 @@
        author = {Bunnik, {E.M.} and Pisas, Linaida and Van Nuenen, {A.C.} and Schuitemaker, Hanneke},
        year = {2008},
        pages = {7932},
-       file = {Bunnik et al_2008_Autologous neutralizing humoral immunity and evolution of the viral envelope in.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/PU4HN6FE/Bunnik et al_2008_Autologous neutralizing humoral immunity and evolution of the viral envelope in.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{liu_selection_2006,
@@ -37,9 +34,7 @@
        journal = {Journal of virology},
        author = {Liu, Yi and {McNevin}, J. and Cao, Jianhong and Zhao, Hong and Genowati, Indira and Wong, Kim and {McLaughlin}, S. and {McSweyn}, {M.D.} and Diem, Kurt and Stevens, {C.E.} and others},
        year = {2006},
-       keywords = {Amino Acid Sequence, {CD8-Positive} T-Lymphocytes, {CD8-Positive} T-Lymphocytes: chemistry, {CD8-Positive} T-Lymphocytes: immunology, Epitopes, Epitopes: chemistry, Epitopes: immunology, {HIV-1}, {HIV-1:} physiology, {HIV} Infections, {HIV} Infections: genetics, {HIV} Infections: immunology, {HIV} Infections: metabolism, {HIV} Infections: virology, Humans, Molecular Sequence Data, Mutation, Mutation: genetics, Proteome, Proteome: chemistry, Proteome: genetics, Proteome: immunology, Proteome: metabolism, Selection, Genetic, Time Factors},
        pages = {9519},
-       file = {Liu et al_2006_Selection on the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteome following primary.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/NIG5HMZ6/Liu et al_2006_Selection on the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteome following primary.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{wilkinson_high-throughput_2008,
@@ -47,7 +42,6 @@
        volume = {6},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.0060096},
        doi = {10.1371/journal.pbio.0060096},
-       abstract = {Development of novel, quantitative, high-throughput {RNA} structure analysis tools allows the outline of structure-function relationships for the first 10\% of an {HIV} genome, discovery of structural differences between regulatory and coding regions, and analysis of protein-{RNA} interactions inside authentic virions.},
        number = {4},
        urldate = {2012-07-03},
        journal = {{PLoS} Biol},
@@ -55,7 +49,6 @@
        month = apr,
        year = {2008},
        pages = {e96},
-       file = {PLoS Full Text PDF:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/ADZTPT97/Wilkinson et al. - 2008 - High-Throughput SHAPE Analysis Reveals Structures .pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{neher_recombination_2010,
        volume = {6},
        url = {http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000660},
        doi = {10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000660},
-       abstract = {The evolutionary dynamics of {HIV} during the chronic phase of infection is driven by the host immune response and by selective pressures exerted through drug treatment. To understand and model the evolution of {HIV} quantitatively, the parameters governing genetic diversification and the strength of selection need to be known. While mutation rates can be measured in single replication cycles, the relevant effective recombination rate depends on the probability of coinfection of a cell with more than one virus and can only be inferred from population data. However, most population genetic estimators for recombination rates assume absence of selection and are hence of limited applicability to {HIV}, since positive and purifying selection are important in {HIV} evolution. Yet, little is known about the distribution of selection differentials between individual viruses and the impact of single polymorphisms on viral fitness. Here, we estimate the rate of recombination and the distribution of selection coefficients from time series sequence data tracking the evolution of {HIV} within single patients. By examining temporal changes in the genetic composition of the population, we estimate the effective recombination to be rho = 1.4+/-0.6 x 10(-5) recombinations per site and generation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the selection coefficients of at least 15\% of the observed non-synonymous polymorphisms exceed 0.8\% per generation. These results provide a basis for a more detailed understanding of the evolution of {HIV.} A particularly interesting case is evolution in response to drug treatment, where recombination can facilitate the rapid acquisition of multiple resistance mutations. With the methods developed here, more precise and more detailed studies will be possible as soon as data with higher time resolution and greater sample sizes are available.},
        number = {1},
        journal = {{PLoS} Comput Biol},
        author = {Neher, {R.A.} and Leitner, Thomas},
        month = jan,
        year = {2010},
-       keywords = {Algorithms, Cluster Analysis, Computational Biology, Computational Biology: methods, Evolution, genetic, Genetic: physiology, {HIV}, {HIV:} genetics, {HIV} Infections, {HIV} Infections: genetics, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Host-Pathogen Interactions: genetics, Molecular, Mutation, Recombination, Selection},
        pages = {e1000660},
-       file = {Neher_Leitner_2010_Recombination rate and selection strength in HIV intra-patient evolution.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/VBB3QFKT/Neher_Leitner_2010_Recombination rate and selection strength in HIV intra-patient evolution.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{neher_genetic_2011,
        author = {Neher, Richard A and Shraiman, Boris},
        year = {2011},
        pages = {975--996},
-       file = {Neher_Shraiman_2011_Genetic Draft and Quasi-Neutrality in Large Facultatively Sexual Populations.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/5METJEHW/Neher_Shraiman_2011_Genetic Draft and Quasi-Neutrality in Large Facultatively Sexual Populations.pdf:application/pdf}
+},
+
+@article{perelson_hiv-1_1996,
+       title = {HIV-1 dynamics in vivo: virion clearance rate, infected cell life-span, and viral generation time.},
+       volume = {271},
+       url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8599114},
+       number = {5255},
+       journal = {Science {(New York, N.Y.)}},
+       author = {Perelson, a S and Neumann, a U and Markowitz, M and Leonard, J M and Ho, D D},
+       month = mar,
+       year = {1996},
+       pages = {1582--6},
 },
 
 @article{shankarappa_consistent_1999,
@@ -95,7 +96,6 @@
        author = {Shankarappa, R. and Margolick, {J.B.} and Gange, {S.J.} and Rodrigo, {A.G.} and Upchurch, David and Farzadegan, Homayoon and Gupta, Phalguni and Rinaldo, {C.R.} and Learn, {G.H.} and He, X. and others},
        year = {1999},
        pages = {10489},
-       file = {Shankarappa et al_1999_Consistent viral evolutionary changes associated with the progression of human.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/84RWMUW8/Shankarappa et al_1999_Consistent viral evolutionary changes associated with the progression of human.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{watts_architecture_2009,
        issn = {0028-0836},
        url = {http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v460/n7256/full/nature08237.html},
        doi = {10.1038/nature08237},
-       abstract = {Single-stranded {RNA} viruses encompass broad classes of infectious agents and cause the common cold, cancer, {AIDS} and other serious health threats. Viral replication is regulated at many levels, including the use of conserved genomic {RNA} structures. Most potential regulatory elements in viral {RNA} genomes are uncharacterized. Here we report the structure of an entire {HIV-1} genome at single nucleotide resolution using {SHAPE}, a high-throughput {RNA} analysis technology. The genome encodes protein structure at two levels. In addition to the correspondence between {RNA} and protein primary sequences, a correlation exists between high levels of {RNA} structure and sequences that encode inter-domain loops in {HIV} proteins. This correlation suggests that {RNA} structure modulates ribosome elongation to promote native protein folding. Some simple genome elements previously shown to be important, including the ribosomal gag-pol frameshift stem-loop, are components of larger {RNA} motifs. We also identify organizational principles for unstructured {RNA} regions, including splice site acceptors and hypervariable regions. These results emphasize that the {HIV-1} genome and, potentially, many coding {RNAs} are punctuated by previously unrecognized regulatory motifs and that extensive {RNA} structure constitutes an important component of the genetic code.},
        language = {en},
        number = {7256},
        urldate = {2012-07-01},
        author = {Watts, Joseph M. and Dang, Kristen K. and Gorelick, Robert J. and Leonard, Christopher W. and Jr, Julian W. Bess and Swanstrom, Ronald and Burch, Christina L. and Weeks, Kevin M.},
        month = aug,
        year = {2009},
-       keywords = {astronomy, astrophysics, biochemistry, bioinformatics, biology, biotechnology, cancer, cell cycle, cell signalling, climate change, computational biology, development, developmental biology, {DNA}, drug discovery, earth science, ecology, environmental science, Evolution, evolutionary biology, functional genomics, genetics, genomics, geophysics, Immunology, interdisciplinary science, life, marine biology, materials science, Medical research, medicine, metabolomics, molecular biology, molecular interactions, nanotechnology, Nature, neurobiology, neuroscience, palaeobiology, pharmacology, physics, proteomics, quantum physics, {RNA}, science, science news, science policy, signal transduction, structural biology, systems biology, transcriptomics},
        pages = {711--716},
-       file = {Full Text PDF:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/T7UGN8ID/Watts et al. - 2009 - Architecture and secondary structure of an entire .pdf:application/pdf}
+},
+
+@article{forsdyke_reciprocal_1995,
+       title = {Reciprocal relationship between stem-loop potential and substitution density in retroviral quasispecies under positive Darwinian selection},
+       volume = {41},
+       issn = {0022-2844, 1432-1432},
+       url = {http://www.springerlink.com/content/n7621n18505m418m/},
+       doi = {10.1007/BF00173184},
+       number = {6},
+       urldate = {2012-07-06},
+       journal = {Journal of Molecular Evolution},
+       author = {Forsdyke, {D.R.}},
+       month = dec,
+       year = {1995},
+},
+
+@article{sanjuan_interplay_2011,
+       title = {Interplay between RNA Structure and Protein Evolution in HIV-1},
+       volume = {28},
+       issn = {0737-4038, 1537-1719},
+       url = {http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/28/4/1333},
+       doi = {10.1093/molbev/msq329},
+       language = {en},
+       number = {4},
+       urldate = {2012-08-14},
+       journal = {Molecular Biology and Evolution},
+       author = {Sanjuan, Rafael and Borderia, Antonio V.},
+       month = apr,
+       year = {2011},
+       pages = {1333--1338},
 },
 
 @article{fernandes_hiv-1_2012,
        month = jan,
        year = {2012},
        pages = {4--9},
-       file = {Fernandes et al_2012_The HIV-1 rev response element.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/SZK3ZGCG/Fernandes et al_2012_The HIV-1 rev response element.pdf:application/pdf;Landes Bioscience Journals: RNA Biology:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/RC8QX4B7/18178.html:text/html}
+},
+
+@article{coleman_virus_2008,
+       title = {Virus Attenuation by Genome-Scale Changes in Codon Pair Bias},
+       volume = {320},
+       issn = {0036-8075, 1095-9203},
+       url = {http://www.sciencemag.org/content/320/5884/1784},
+       doi = {10.1126/science.1155761},
+       language = {en},
+       number = {5884},
+       urldate = {2012-10-08},
+       journal = {Science},
+       author = {Coleman, J. Robert and Papamichail, Dimitris and Skiena, Steven and Futcher, Bruce and Wimmer, Eckard and Mueller, Steffen},
+       month = jun,
+       year = {2008},
+       pages = {1784--1787},
 },
 
 @article{ngumbela_quantitative_2008,
        volume = {3},
        url = {http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0002356},
        doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0002356},
-       abstract = {{BackgroundThe} sequences of wild-isolate strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 {(HIV-1)} are characterized by low {GC} content and suboptimal codon usage. Codon optimization of {DNA} vectors can enhance protein expression both by enhancing translational efficiency, and by altering {RNA} stability and export. Although gag codon optimization is widely used in {DNA} vectors and experimental vaccines, the actual effect of altered codon usage on gag translational efficiency has not been {quantified.Methodology} and Principal {FindingsTo} quantify translational efficiency of gag {mRNA} in live T cells, we transfected Jurkat cells with increasing doses of capped, polyadenylated synthetic {mRNA} corresponding to wildtype or codon-optimized gag sequences, measured Gag production by quantitative {ELISA} and flow cytometry, and estimated the translational efficiency of each transcript as pg of Gag antigen produced per µg of input {mRNA.} We found that codon optimization yielded a small increase in gag translational efficiency (approximately 1.6 fold). In contrast when cells were transfected with {DNA} vectors requiring nuclear transcription and processing of gag {mRNA}, codon optimization resulted in a very large enhancement of Gag {production.ConclusionsWe} conclude that suboptimal codon usage by {HIV-1} results in only a slight loss of gag translational efficiency per se, with the vast majority of enhancement in protein expression from {DNA} vectors due to altered processing and export of nuclear {RNA.}},
        number = {6},
        urldate = {2012-10-08},
        journal = {{PLoS} {ONE}},
        month = jun,
        year = {2008},
        pages = {e2356},
-       file = {Ngumbela et al_2008_Quantitative Effect of Suboptimal Codon Usage on Translational Efficiency of.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/4HIE4DTU/Ngumbela et al_2008_Quantitative Effect of Suboptimal Codon Usage on Translational Efficiency of.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{plotkin_codon_2003,
        issn = {0027-8424, 1091-6490},
        url = {http://www.pnas.org/content/100/12/7152},
        doi = {10.1073/pnas.1132114100},
-       abstract = {Although the surface proteins of human influenza A virus evolve rapidly and continually produce antigenic variants, the internal viral genes acquire mutations very gradually. In this paper, we analyze the sequence evolution of three influenza A genes over the past two decades. We study codon usage as a discriminating signature of gene- and even residue-specific diversifying and purifying selection. Nonrandom codon choice can increase or decrease the effective local substitution rate. We demonstrate that the codons of hemagglutinin, particularly those in the antibody-combining regions, are significantly biased toward substitutional point mutations relative to the codons of other influenza virus genes. We discuss the evolutionary interpretation and implications of these biases for hemagglutinin's antigenic evolution. We also introduce information-theoretic methods that use sequence data to detect regions of recent positive selection and potential protein conformational changes.},
        language = {en},
        number = {12},
        urldate = {2012-10-17},
        month = jun,
        year = {2003},
        pages = {7152--7157},
-       file = {Plotkin_Dushoff_2003_Codon bias and frequency-dependent selection on the hemagglutinin epitopes of.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/5T9U4ZV8/Plotkin_Dushoff_2003_Codon bias and frequency-dependent selection on the hemagglutinin epitopes of.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/7W55GXAK/7152.html:text/html}
 },
 
 @article{jenkins_extent_2003,
        issn = {0168-1702},
        url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016817020200309X},
        doi = {10.1016/S0168-1702(02)00309-X},
-       abstract = {Revealing the determinants of codon usage bias is central to the understanding of factors governing viral evolution. Herein, we report the results of a survey of codon usage bias in a wide range of genetically and ecologically diverse human {RNA} viruses. This analysis showed that the overall extent of codon usage bias in {RNA} viruses is low and that there is little variation in bias between genes. Furthermore, the strong correlation between base and dinucleotide composition and codon usage bias suggested that mutation pressure rather than natural (translational) selection is the most important determinant of the codon bias observed. However, we also detected correlations between codon usage bias and some characteristics of viral genome structure and ecology, with increased bias in segmented and aerosol-transmitted viruses and decreased bias in vector-borne viruses. This suggests that translational selection may also have some influence in shaping codon usage bias.},
        number = {1},
        urldate = {2012-10-19},
        journal = {Virus Research},
        year = {2003},
        keywords = {Base composition, codon usage bias, Dinucleotide, Mutation pressure, Translational selection},
        pages = {1--7},
-       file = {Jenkins_Holmes_2003_The extent of codon usage bias in human RNA viruses and its evolutionary origin.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/TQQ8N6Q5/Jenkins_Holmes_2003_The extent of codon usage bias in human RNA viruses and its evolutionary origin.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/TIQC6BSM/S016817020200309X.html:text/html}
+},
+
+@article{bronson_nucleotide_1994,
+       title = {Nucleotide composition as a driving force in the evolution of retroviruses},
+       volume = {38},
+       issn = {0022-2844, 1432-1432},
+       url = {http://www.springerlink.com/content/c7m6653t2751w071/},
+       doi = {10.1007/BF00178851},
+       number = {5},
+       urldate = {2012-10-22},
+       journal = {Journal of Molecular Evolution},
+       author = {Bronson, Edward C. and Anderson, John N.},
+       month = may,
+       year = {1994},
+       pages = {506--532},
 },
 
 @article{li_codon-usage-based_2012,
        issn = {0028-0836},
        url = {http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature11433.html?WT.ec_id=NATURE-20120927},
        doi = {10.1038/nature11433},
-       abstract = {In mammals, one of the most pronounced consequences of viral infection is the induction of type I interferons, cytokines with potent antiviral activity. Schlafen {(Slfn)} genes are a subset of interferon-stimulated early response genes {(ISGs)} that are also induced directly by pathogens via the interferon regulatory factor 3 {(IRF3)} pathway. However, many {ISGs} are of unknown or incompletely understood function. Here we show that human {SLFN11} potently and specifically abrogates the production of retroviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus 1 {(HIV-1).} Our study revealed that {SLFN11} has no effect on the early steps of the retroviral infection cycle, including reverse transcription, integration and transcription. Rather, {SLFN11} acts at the late stage of virus production by selectively inhibiting the expression of viral proteins in a codon-usage-dependent manner. We further find that {SLFN11} binds transfer {RNA}, and counteracts changes in the {tRNA} pool elicited by the presence of {HIV.} Our studies identified a novel antiviral mechanism within the innate immune response, in which {SLFN11} selectively inhibits viral protein synthesis in {HIV-infected} cells by means of codon-bias discrimination.},
        language = {en},
        urldate = {2012-11-05},
        journal = {Nature},
        author = {Li, Manqing and Kao, Elaine and Gao, Xia and Sandig, Hilary and Limmer, Kirsten and Pavon-Eternod, Mariana and Jones, Thomas E. and Landry, Sebastien and Pan, Tao and Weitzman, Matthew D. and David, Michael},
        year = {2012},
-       keywords = {Cell biology, Immunology, Medical research, Virology},
-       file = {Li et al_2012_Codon-usage-based inhibition of HIV protein synthesis by human schlafen 11.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/A34V5IJT/Li et al_2012_Codon-usage-based inhibition of HIV protein synthesis by human schlafen 11.pdf:application/pdf}
+},
+
+@article{boltz_ultrasensitive_2012,
+       title = {Ultrasensitive Allele-Specific {PCR} Reveals Rare Preexisting Drug-Resistant Variants and a Large Replicating Virus Population in Macaques Infected with a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reverse Transcriptase},
+       volume = {86},
+       issn = {0022-{538X}, 1098-5514},
+       url = {http://jvi.asm.org/content/86/23/12525},
+       doi = {10.1128/JVI.01963-12},
+       language = {en},
+       number = {23},
+       urldate = {2012-11-08},
+       journal = {Journal of Virology},
+       author = {Boltz, Valerie F. and Ambrose, Zandrea and Kearney, Mary F. and Shao, Wei and {KewalRamani}, Vineet N. and Maldarelli, Frank and Mellors, John W. and Coffin, John M.},
+       month = dec,
+       year = {2012},
+       pages = {12525--12530},
 },
 
 @article{kwong_hiv-1_2002,
        volume = {420},
        url = {http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v420/n6916/abs/nature01188.html},
        doi = {10.1038/nature01188},
-       abstract = {The ability of human immunodeficiency virus {(HIV-1)} to persist and cause {AIDS} is dependent on its avoidance of antibody-mediated neutralization. The virus elicits abundant, envelope-directed antibodies that have little neutralization capacity. This lack of neutralization is paradoxical, given the functional conservation and exposure of receptor-binding sites on the gp120 envelope glycoprotein, which are larger than the typical antibody footprint and should therefore be accessible for antibody binding. Because gp120–receptor interactions involve conformational reorganization, we measured the entropies of binding for 20 gp120-reactive antibodies. Here we show that recognition by receptor-binding-site antibodies induces conformational change. Correlation with neutralization potency and analysis of receptor–antibody thermodynamic cycles suggested a receptor-binding-site 'conformational masking' mechanism of neutralization escape. To understand how such an escape mechanism would be compatible with virus–receptor interactions, we tested a soluble dodecameric receptor molecule and found that it neutralized primary {HIV-1} isolates with great potency, showing that simultaneous binding of viral envelope glycoproteins by multiple receptors creates sufficient avidity to compensate for such masking. Because this solution is available for cell-surface receptors but not for most antibodies, conformational masking enables {HIV-1} to maintain receptor binding and simultaneously to resist neutralization.},
        number = {6916},
        urldate = {2012-11-22},
        journal = {Nature},
        author = {Kwong, Peter D. and Doyle, Michael L. and Casper, David J. and Cicala, Claudia and Leavitt, Stephanie A. and Majeed, Shahzad and Steenbeke, Tavis D. and Venturi, Miro and Chaiken, Irwin and Fung, Michael and Katinger, Hermann and Parren, Paul W. I. H. and Robinson, James and Ryk, Donald Van and Wang, Liping and Burton, Dennis R. and Freire, Ernesto and Wyatt, Richard and Sodroski, Joseph and Hendrickson, Wayne A. and Arthos, James},
        month = dec,
        year = {2002},
-       keywords = {astronomy, astrophysics, biochemistry, bioinformatics, biology, biotechnology, cancer, cell cycle, cell signalling, climate change, computational biology, development, developmental biology, {DNA}, drug discovery, earth science, ecology, environmental science, Evolution, evolutionary biology, functional genomics, genetics, genomics, geophysics, Immunology, interdisciplinary science, life, marine biology, materials science, Medical research, medicine, metabolomics, molecular biology, molecular interactions, nanotechnology, Nature, neurobiology, neuroscience, palaeobiology, pharmacology, physics, proteomics, quantum physics, {RNA}, science, science news, science policy, signal transduction, structural biology, systems biology, transcriptomics},
        pages = {678},
-       file = {Kwong et al_2002_HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralization through conformational masking of.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/FV6ASWG5/Kwong et al_2002_HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralization through conformational masking of.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{pantaleo_immunopathogenesis_1996,
        volume = {50},
        url = {http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.micro.50.1.825},
        doi = {10.1146/annurev.micro.50.1.825},
-       abstract = {The rate of progression of {HIV} disease may be substantially different among {HIV-infected} individuals. Following infection of the host with any virus, the delicate balance between virus replication and the immune response to the virus determines both the outcome of the infection, i.e. the persistence versus elimination of the virus, and the different rates of progression. During primary {HIV} infection, a burst of viremia occurs that disseminates virus to the lymphoid organs. A potent immune response ensues that substantially, but usually not completely, curtails virus replication. This inability of the immune system to completely eliminate the virus leads to establishment of chronic, persistent infection that over time leads to profound immunosuppression. The potential mechanisms of virus escape from an otherwise effective immune response have been investigated. Clonal deletion of {HIV-specific} cytotoxic T-cell clones and sequestration of virus-specific cytotoxic cells away from the major site of virus replication represent important mechanisms of virus escape from the immune response that favor persistence of {HIV.} Qualitative differences in the primary immune response to {HIV} (i.e. mobilization of a restricted versus broader T-cell receptor repertoire) are associated with different rates of disease progression. Therefore, the initial interaction between the virus and immune system of the host is critical for the subsequent clinical outcome.},
        number = {1},
        urldate = {2012-11-28},
        journal = {Annual Review of Microbiology},
        author = {Pantaleo, G. and Fauci, A. S.},
        year = {1996},
        note = {{PMID:} 8905100},
-       keywords = {immunologic events, mechanisms of virus escape, primary infection, virologic events},
        pages = {825--854},
-       file = {Pantaleo_Fauci_1996_Immunopathogenesis of Hiv Infection1.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/6K23TVM3/Pantaleo_Fauci_1996_Immunopathogenesis of Hiv Infection1.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{barat_interaction_1991,
        issn = {0305-1048, 1362-4962},
        url = {http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/content/19/4/751},
        doi = {10.1093/nar/19.4.751},
-       abstract = {Using synthetic oligonucleotides, a gene encoding the {HIV-1} replication primer, {tRNALys},3, was constructed and placed downstream from a bacteriophage T7 promoter. In vitro transcription of this gene yielded a form of {tRNALys},3 which lacks the modified bases characteristic of the natural species and the 3′-G-A-dinucieotide. Synthetic {tRNALys},3 annealed to a pbs- {HIV1} {RNA} template can prime {cDNA} synthesis catalysed by recombinant {HIV-1} reverse transcriptase. Trans-{DDP} crosslinking indicates that this synthetic {tRNA} is still capable of interacting with {HIV-1} {RT} via a 12-nucleotide portion encompassing the anticodon domain. Gel-mobility shift and competition analyses imply that the affinity of synthetic {tRNA} for {RT} is reduced. In contrast to earlier observations, synthetic {tRNA} is readily competed from {RT} by natural {tRNAPro.} The reduced affinity of synthetic {tRNALys},3 for {RT} is not appreciably affected by mutations in positions within the loop of the anticodon domain. These results would imply that the overall structure of the anticodon domain of {tRNALys},3 is an important factor in its recognition by {HIV-1} {RT.} In addition, modified bases within this, although not absolutely required, would appear to make a significant contribution to the enhanced stability of the ribonucleoprotein complex.},
        language = {en},
        number = {4},
        urldate = {2012-11-28},
        month = feb,
        year = {1991},
        pages = {751--757},
-       file = {Barat et al_1991_Interaction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with a synthetic form of its.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/DE7QDN23/Barat et al_1991_Interaction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with a synthetic form of its.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/IDQCT4AN/751.html:text/html}
 },
 
 @article{barat_hiv-1_1989,
        volume = {8},
        issn = {0261-4189},
        url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC401457/},
-       abstract = {The virion cores of the replication competent type 1 human immunodeficiency virus {(HIV-1)}, a retrovirus, contain and {RNA} genome associated with nucleocapsid {(NC)} and reverse transcriptase {(RT} p66/p51) molecules. In vitro reconstructions of these complexes with purified components show that {NC} is required for efficient annealing of the primer {tRNALys},3. In the absence of {NC}, {HIV-1} {RT} is unable to retrotranscribe the viral {RNA} template from the {tRNA} primer. We demonstrate that the {HIV-1} {RT} p66/p51 specifically binds to its cognate primer {tRNALys},3 even in the presence of a 100-fold molar excess of other {tRNAs.} Cross-linking analysis of this interaction locates the contact site to a region within the heavily modified anti-codon domain of {tRNALys},3.},
        number = {11},
        urldate = {2012-11-28},
        journal = {The {EMBO} Journal},
        note = {{PMID:} 2479543
 {PMCID:} {PMC401457}},
        pages = {3279--3285},
-       file = {Barat et al_1989_HIV-1 reverse transcriptase specifically interacts with the anticodon domain of.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/G7ZXPA5K/Barat et al_1989_HIV-1 reverse transcriptase specifically interacts with the anticodon domain of.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{paillart_vitro_2002,
        issn = {0021-9258, 1083-{351X}},
        url = {http://www.jbc.org/content/277/8/5995},
        doi = {10.1074/jbc.M108972200},
-       abstract = {The 5′-untranslated leader region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 {(HIV-1)} {RNA} contains multiple signals that control distinct steps of the viral replication cycle such as transcription, reverse transcription, genomic {RNA} dimerization, splicing, and packaging. It is likely that fine tuned coordinated regulation of these functions is achieved through specific {RNA-protein} and {RNA-RNA} interactions. In a search for cis-acting elements important for the tertiary structure of the 5′-untranslated region of {HIV-1} genomic {RNA}, we identified, by ladder selection experiments, a short stretch of nucleotides directly downstream of the {poly(A)} signal that interacts with a nucleotide sequence located in the matrix region. Confirmation of the sequence of the interacting sites was obtained by partial or complete inhibition of this interaction by antisense oligonucleotides and by nucleotide substitutions. In the wild type {RNA}, this long range interaction was intramolecular, since no intermolecular {RNA} association was detected by gel electrophoresis with an {RNA} mutated in the dimerization initiation site and containing both sequences involved in the tertiary interaction. Moreover, the functional importance of this interaction is supported by its conservation in all {HIV-1} isolates as well as in {HIV-2} and simian immunodeficiency virus. Our results raise the possibility that this long range {RNA-RNA} interaction might be involved in the full-length genomic {RNA} selection during packaging, repression of the 5′ polyadenylation signal, and/or splicing regulation.},
        language = {en},
        number = {8},
        urldate = {2012-11-28},
        month = feb,
        year = {2002},
        pages = {5995--6004},
-       file = {Paillart et al_2002_In Vitro Evidence for a Long Range Pseudoknot in the 5′-Untranslated and Matrix.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/W9QV5ZQG/Paillart et al_2002_In Vitro Evidence for a Long Range Pseudoknot in the 5′-Untranslated and Matrix.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/ESVZJ42C/5995.html:text/html}
 },
 
 @book{ewens_mathematical_2004,
        title = {Mathematical Population Genetics: I. Theoretical Introduction},
        isbn = {9780387201917},
        shorttitle = {Mathematical Population Genetics},
-       abstract = {This is the first of a planned two-volume work discussing the mathematical aspects of population genetics with an emphasis on evolutionary theory. This volume draws heavily from the author’s 1979 classic, but it has been revised and expanded to include recent topics which follow naturally from the treatment in the earlier edition, such as the theory of molecular population genetics.},
        language = {en},
        publisher = {Springer},
        author = {Ewens, Warren J.},
        month = jan,
        year = {2004},
-       keywords = {Mathematics / Applied, Science / Life Sciences / Evolution}
-}
\ No newline at end of file
+},
+
+@article{zanini_ffpopsim:_2012,
+       title = {{FFPopSim:} An efficient forward simulation package for the evolution of large populations},
+       issn = {1367-4803, 1460-2059},
+       shorttitle = {{FFPopSim}},
+       url = {http://bioinformatics.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/10/24/bioinformatics.bts633},
+       doi = {10.1093/bioinformatics/bts633},
+       language = {en},
+       urldate = {2012-12-01},
+       journal = {Bioinformatics},
+       author = {Zanini, Fabio and Neher, Richard A.},
+       month = oct,
+       year = {2012},
+},
+
+@article{desai_beneficial_2007,
+       title = {Beneficial mutation selection balance and the effect of linkage on positive selection.},
+       volume = {176},
+       doi = {10.1534/genetics.106.067678},
+       number = {3},
+       journal = {Genetics},
+       author = {Desai, Michael M and Fisher, Daniel S},
+       month = jul,
+       year = {2007},
+       pages = {1759--98},
+},
+
+@article{richman_rapid_2003,
+       title = {Rapid evolution of the neutralizing antibody response to {HIV} type 1 infection},
+       volume = {100},
+       issn = {0027-8424, 1091-6490},
+       url = {http://www.pnas.org/content/100/7/4144},
+       doi = {10.1073/pnas.0630530100},
+       number = {7},
+       urldate = {2012-11-22},
+       journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
+       author = {Richman, Douglas D. and Wrin, Terri and Little, Susan J. and Petropoulos, Christos J.},
+       month = apr,
+       year = {2003},
+       pages = {4144--4149},
+},
+
+@article{moore_limited_2009,
+       title = {Limited Neutralizing Antibody Specificities Drive Neutralization Escape in Early HIV-1 Subtype C Infection},
+       volume = {5},
+       url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000598},
+       doi = {10.1371/journal.ppat.1000598},
+       number = {9},
+       urldate = {2012-08-17},
+       journal = {PLoS Pathog},
+       author = {Moore, Penny L. and Ranchobe, Nthabeleng and Lambson, Bronwen E. and Gray, Elin S. and Cave, Eleanor and Abrahams, Melissa-Rose and Bandawe, Gama and Mlisana, Koleka and Abdool Karim, Salim S. and Williamson, Carolyn and Morris, Lynn and the {CAPRISA} 002 study and the {NIAID} Center for {HIV/AIDS} Vaccine Immunology {(CHAVI)}},
+       month = sep,
+       year = {2009},
+       pages = {e1000598},
+},
+
+@article{brenner_high_2007,
+       title = {High Rates of Forward Transmission Events after Acute/Early HIV-1 Infection},
+       volume = {195},
+       issn = {0022-1899, 1537-6613},
+       url = {http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/195/7/951},
+       doi = {10.1086/512088},
+       language = {en},
+       number = {7},
+       urldate = {2012-12-02},
+       journal = {Journal of Infectious Diseases},
+       author = {Brenner, Bluma G. and Roger, Michel and Routy, Jean-Pierre and Moisi, Daniela and Ntemgwa, Michel and Matte, Claudine and Baril, Jean-Guy and Thomas, Rejean and Rouleau, Danielle and Bruneau, Julie and Leblanc, Roger and Legault, Mario and Tremblay, Cecile and Charest, Hugues and Wainberg, Mark A.},
+       month = apr,
+       year = {2007},
+       pages = {951--959},
+},
+
+@article{strelkowa_clonal_2012,
+       title = {Clonal Interference in the Evolution of Influenza},
+       issn = {0016-6731, 1943-2631},
+       url = {http://www.genetics.org/content/early/2012/07/20/genetics.112.143396},
+       doi = {10.1534/genetics.112.143396},
+       language = {en},
+       urldate = {2012-08-01},
+       journal = {Genetics},
+       author = {Strelkowa, Natalja and Laessig, Michael},
+       month = jul,
+       year = {2012},
+},
+
+@article{mansky_lower_1995,
+       title = {Lower In Vivo Mutation Rate of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 than That Predicted from the Fidelity of Purified Reverse Transcriptase},
+       volume = {69},
+       url = {file:///home/fabio/university/evolution/references/J. Virol.-1995-Mansky-5087-94.pdf},
+       number = {8},
+       journal = {Journal of virology},
+       author = {Mansky, L M and Temin, H M},
+       year = {1995},
+       pages = {5087--5094},
+},
+
+@article{mcmichael_immune_2009,
+       title = {The immune response during acute {HIV-1} infection: clues for vaccine development},
+       volume = {10},
+       url = {http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nri2674},
+       doi = {10.1038/nri2674},
+       number = {1},
+       journal = {Nature Reviews Immunology},
+       author = {{McMichael}, Andrew J. and Borrow, Persephone and Tomaras, Georgia D. and Goonetilleke, Nilu and Haynes, Barton F.},
+       month = dec,
+       year = {2009},
+       pages = {11--23},
+},
+
+@article{williamson_adaptation_2003,
+       title = {Adaptation in the env gene of {HIV-1} and evolutionary theories of disease progression.},
+       volume = {20},
+       url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12777505},
+       doi = {10.1093/molbev/msg144},
+       number = {8},
+       journal = {Molecular biology and evolution},
+       author = {Williamson, Scott},
+       year = {2003},
+       pages = {1318--25},
+},
+
+@article{smith_hitch-hiking_1974,
+       title = {The hitch-hiking effect of a favourable gene},
+       volume = {23},
+       number = {1},
+       journal = {Genetical research},
+       author = {Smith, J M and Haigh, J},
+       month = feb,
+       year = {1974},
+       note = {{PMID:} 4407212},
+       pages = {23--35}
+},
+
+@article{josefsson_majority_2011,
+       title = {Majority of {CD4+} T cells from peripheral blood of {HIV-1–infected} individuals contain only one {HIV} {DNA} molecule},
+       volume = {108},
+       issn = {0027-8424, 1091-6490},
+       url = {http://www.pnas.org/content/108/27/11199},
+       doi = {10.1073/pnas.1107729108},
+       language = {en},
+       number = {27},
+       urldate = {2012-12-06},
+       journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
+       author = {Josefsson, Lina and King, Martin S. and Makitalo, Barbro and Br\"annstr\"om, Johan and Shao, Wei and Maldarelli, Frank and Kearney, Mary F. and Hu, Wei-Shau and Chen, Jianbo and Gaines, Hans and Mellors, John W. and Albert, Jan and Coffin, John M. and Palmer, Sarah E.},
+       month = jul,
+       year = {2011},
+       pages = {11199--11204},
+},
+
+@article{bar_early_2012,
+       title = {Early Low-Titer Neutralizing Antibodies Impede {HIV-1} Replication and Select for Virus Escape},
+       volume = {8},
+       url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1002721},
+       doi = {10.1371/journal.ppat.1002721},
+       number = {5},
+       urldate = {2012-12-06},
+       journal = {{PLoS} Pathog},
+       author = {Bar, Katharine J. and Tsao, Chun-yen and Iyer, Shilpa S. and Decker, Julie M. and Yang, Yongping and Bonsignori, Mattia and Chen, Xi and Hwang, Kwan-Ki and Montefiori, David C. and Liao, Hua-Xin and Hraber, Peter and Fischer, William and Li, Hui and Wang, Shuyi and Sterrett, Sarah and Keele, Brandon F. and Ganusov, Vitaly V. and Perelson, Alan S. and Korber, Bette T. and Georgiev, Ivelin and {McLellan}, Jason S. and Pavlicek, Jeffrey W. and Gao, Feng and Haynes, Barton F. and Hahn, Beatrice H. and Kwong, Peter D. and Shaw, George M.},
+       month = may,
+       year = {2012},
+       pages = {e1002721}
+},
+
+@article{gillespie_genetic_2000,
+       title = {Genetic drift in an infinite population. The pseudohitchhiking model.},
+       volume = {155},
+       url = {http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1461093&tool=pmcentrez&rendertype=abstract},
+       number = {2},
+       journal = {Genetics},
+       author = {Gillespie, J H},
+       month = jul,
+       year = {2000},
+       pages = {909--19},
+},
+
+@article{yang_statistical_2000,
+       title = {Statistical methods for detecting molecular adaptation},
+       volume = {15},
+       issn = {0169-5347},
+       url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169534700019947},
+       doi = {10.1016/S0169-5347(00)01994-7},
+       number = {12},
+       urldate = {2012-12-14},
+       journal = {Trends in Ecology \& Evolution},
+       author = {Yang, Ziheng and Bielawski, Joseph P.},
+       month = dec,
+       year = {2000},
+       pages = {496--503},
+},
+
+@article{neher_rate_2010,
+       title = {Rate of adaptation in large sexual populations},
+       volume = {184},
+       url = {http://www.genetics.org/cgi/content/abstract/184/2/467},
+       doi = {10.1534/genetics.109.109009},
+       number = {2},
+       journal = {Genetics},
+       author = {Neher, {R.A.} and Shraiman, {B.I.} and Fisher, {D.S.}},
+       year = {2010},
+       pages = {467},
+},
+
+@book{LANL2012,
+        title = {HIV Sequence Compendium 2012},
+       author = {Kuiken, Carla and Leitner, Thomas and Hahn, Beatrice and Mullins, James and Wolinsky, Steven and Foley, Brian and Apetrei, Cristian and Mizrachi, Ilene and Rambaut, Andrew and Korber, Bette},
+       year = {2012},
+       publisher = {Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group T-6, Mail Stop K710 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 U.S.A.},
+},
+
+@article{edgar_muscle:_2004,
+       title = {{MUSCLE:} multiple sequence alignment with high accuracy and high throughput},
+       volume = {32},
+       issn = {0305-1048, 1362-4962},
+       shorttitle = {{MUSCLE}},
+       url = {http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/content/32/5/1792},
+       doi = {10.1093/nar/gkh340},
+       language = {en},
+       number = {5},
+       urldate = {2012-12-20},
+       journal = {Nucleic Acids Research},
+       author = {Edgar, Robert C.},
+       month = mar,
+       year = {2004},
+       pages = {1792--1797},
+},
+
+@article{mueller_live_2010,
+       title = {Live attenuated influenza virus vaccines by computer-aided rational design},
+       volume = {28},
+       copyright = {© 2010 Nature Publishing Group},
+       issn = {1087-0156},
+       url = {http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v28/n7/abs/nbt.1636.html},
+       doi = {10.1038/nbt.1636},
+       language = {en},
+       number = {7},
+       urldate = {2012-10-08},
+       journal = {Nature Biotechnology},
+       author = {Mueller, Steffen and Coleman, J. Robert and Papamichail, Dimitris and Ward, Charles B. and Nimnual, Anjaruwee and Futcher, Bruce and Skiena, Steven and Wimmer, Eckard},
+       year = {2010},
+       pages = {723--726},
+}
+