fixed typos
authorRichard <richard.neher@tuebingen.mpg.de>
Wed, 5 Jun 2013 15:00:57 +0000 (17:00 +0200)
committerRichard <richard.neher@tuebingen.mpg.de>
Wed, 5 Jun 2013 15:00:57 +0000 (17:00 +0200)
synmut.tex

index e104137..1dc7215 100644 (file)
@@ -113,9 +113,9 @@ between viral reverse transcriptase, viral ssRNA, and the host
 tRNA$^\text{Lys3}$: the latter is required for priming reverse transcription
 (RT) and is bound by a pseudoknotted RNA structure in the viral 5' untranslated
 region~\citep{barat_interaction_1991, paillart_vitro_2002}. 
-Besides these well characterized and conservered structures, large parts of the virus
+Besides these well characterized and conserved structures, large parts of the virus
 genome are folded into structures of unknown function
-\citep{watts_architecture_2009}. These poorely characterized RNA
+\citep{watts_architecture_2009}. These poorly characterized RNA
 structures are conserved to varying degree between HIV-1 and
 SIV in the sense that corresponding regions tend to be part of
 of similar structural elements. Individual base pairings, however, are
@@ -182,7 +182,7 @@ SNVs (top) and nonsynonymous SNVs (bottom) observed in the
 \shankaregion{} region of \env{} in a chronically HIV-1 infected patient (p10 from
 \citet{shankarappa_consistent_1999}). Despite many synonymous SNVs
 reaching high frequency, very few fix (panel~\ref{fig:aftsyn}); in
-constrast, many nonsynonymous mutations fix
+contrast, many nonsynonymous mutations fix
 (panel~\ref{fig:aftnonsyn}). This observation seems at odds with
 the assumption of neutrality.
 
@@ -311,7 +311,7 @@ codon usage bias (CUB). HIV-1 is known to prefer A-rich codons over highly
 expressed human codons \citep{jenkins_extent_2003, kuyl_biased_2012}. We
 did not find any evidence for a contribution of average CUB to the ultimate
 fate of synonymous SNVs; this is consistent with the observation that HIV-1 is not
-adapting its codon usage to its human host cells at the macroevolutionary level
+adapting its codon usage to its human host cells at the macro-evolutionary level
 \citep{kuyl_biased_2012}.
 
 \begin{figure}
@@ -321,7 +321,7 @@ adapting its codon usage to its human host cells at the macroevolutionary level
 \caption{Permissible synonymous mutations tend to be unpaired.
 Panel A) shows the distribution of SHAPE reactivities among sites at which synonymous 
 SNVs fixed (red), sites at which SNVs reached frequencies above 15\% but
-were susequently lost (blue), and sites at which no high-frequency SNVs were observed (green) 
+were subsequently lost (blue), and sites at which no high-frequency SNVs were observed (green) 
 (all categories are restricted to the regions V1-V5$\pm 100$bp).
 Sites at which SNVs fixed tend to have higher SHAPE reactivities, corresponding to
 less base pairing, than those at which SNVs are lost.
@@ -483,7 +483,7 @@ in terms of replication, packaging, etc.~is most likely to eventually fix, while
 all others are lost. The emergence of multiple competing escape SNVs in HIV-1
 infections has been shown \citep{moore_limited_2009, bar_early_2012}. 
 Similarly, this scenario has been explicitly observed in the evolution of
-resistance to 3TC, where the mutation M184V is often preceeded by M184I
+resistance to 3TC, where the mutation M184V is often preceded by M184I
 \citep{hedskog_dynamics_2010}. We implemented within epitope competition 
 in the model by allowing multiple escape mutations per epitope that do
 not provide additional benefit to the virus when combined. Again, we found that the potential for
@@ -538,7 +538,7 @@ at synonymous sites varies greatly along the HIV-1 genome
 selection on proteins substantially \citep{ngandu_extensive_2008}. 
 The dynamic nature of HIV secondary structure makes finding the 
 compensatory mutations that would restore base pairing in the
-longitundinal data difficult, since the exact base pairing pattern is
+longitudinal data difficult, since the exact base pairing pattern is
 most likely different than in the reference sequence. 
 
 Selection against the majority of synonymous substitutions is probably
@@ -672,7 +672,7 @@ its logarithm was uniformly distributed  between $10^{-4}$ and $10^{-2}$; the
 average escape rate $\epsilon$ of escape mutation was sampled such that its logarithm was
 uniform between $10^{-2.5}$ and $10^{-1.5}$ and the rate $k_A$ of new antibody
 challenges such that its logarithm was uniform between $10^{-3}$ and $10^{-2}$
-per generation. Populations were initialized with a homogenous founder
+per generation. Populations were initialized with a homogeneous founder
 population and were kept at an average size of $N=10^4$ throughout the
 simulation. After 30 generations of burn-in to create genetic diversity, new
 epitopes were introduced at a constant rate $k_A$. 
@@ -707,7 +707,7 @@ All analysis and computer simulation scripts, as well as the sequence alignments
 used, are available for download at \url{http://git.tuebingen.mpg.de/synmut}.
 
 %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
-\section*{Acknowledgements}
+\section*{Acknowledgments}
 %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
 We thank Jan Albert, Trevor Bedford, Pleuni Pennings and members of the lab for 
 stimulating discussions and critical reading of the manuscript.