More discussion on RNA stuff + citations
authorFabio Zanini <fabio.zanini@tuebingen.mpg.de>
Wed, 29 May 2013 09:42:10 +0000 (11:42 +0200)
committerFabio Zanini <fabio.zanini@tuebingen.mpg.de>
Wed, 29 May 2013 09:42:18 +0000 (11:42 +0200)
bib.bib
synmut.tex

diff --git a/bib.bib b/bib.bib
index eddba60..936ee49 100644 (file)
--- a/bib.bib
+++ b/bib.bib
@@ -923,7 +923,7 @@ rating = {0}
        number = {4},
        urldate = {2013-05-24},
        journal = {{RNA} Biology},
-       author = {{Stefanie A. Knoepfel} and {Ben Berkhout}},
+       author = {Knoepfel, S. A. and Berkhout, B.},
        month = mar,
        year = {2013},
        pages = {512--524},
@@ -944,5 +944,17 @@ rating = {0}
        year = {2013},
        pages = {e1003294},
        file = {PLoS Snapshot:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/RK3N6NJ9/t.html:text/html;Pollom et al_2013_Comparison of SIV and HIV-1 Genomic RNA Structures Reveals Impact of Sequence.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/8REQXV5G/Pollom et al_2013_Comparison of SIV and HIV-1 Genomic RNA Structures Reveals Impact of Sequence.pdf:application/pdf}
-}
+},
 
+@article{pennings_loss_2013,
+       title = {Loss and Recovery of Genetic Diversity in Adapting Populations of {HIV}},
+       url = {http://arxiv.org/abs/1303.3666},
+       abstract = {A population's adaptive potential is the likelihood that it will adapt in response to an environmental challenge, e.g., develop resistance in response to drug treatment. The effective population size inferred from genetic diversity at neutral sites has been traditionally taken as a major predictor of adaptive potential. However recent studies demonstrate that such effective population size vastly underestimates the population's adaptive potential (Karasov 2010). Here we use data from treated {HIV-infected} patients (Bacheler2000) to estimate the effective size of {HIV} populations relevant for adaptation. Our estimate is based on the frequencies of soft and hard selective sweeps of a known resistance mutation {K103N.} We observe that 41\% of {HIV} populations in this study acquire resistance via at least two functionally equivalent but distinct mutations which sweep to fixation without significantly reducing genetic diversity at neighboring sites (soft selective sweeps). We further estimate that 20\% of populations acquire a resistant allele via a single mutation that sweeps to fixation and drastically reduces genetic diversity (hard selective sweeps). We infer that the effective population size that determines the adaptive potential of within-patient {HIV} populations is approximately 150,000. Our estimate is two orders of magniture higher than a classical estimate based on diversity at synonymous sites. Three not mutually exclusive reasons can explain this discrepancy: (1) some synonymous mutations may be under selection; (2) highly beneficial mutations may be less affected by ongoing linked selection than synonymous mutations; and (3) synonymous diversity may not be at its expected equilibrium because it recovers slowly from sweeps and bottlenecks.},
+       urldate = {2013-03-27},
+       journal = {{arXiv:1303.3666}},
+       author = {Pennings, Pleuni and Kryazhimskiy, Sergey and Wakeley, John},
+       month = mar,
+       year = {2013},
+       keywords = {Quantitative Biology - Populations and Evolution},
+       file = {1303.3666 PDF:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/MXRJDU5C/Pennings et al. - 2013 - Loss and Recovery of Genetic Diversity in Adapting.pdf:application/pdf;arXiv.org Snapshot:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/8AHZ95UI/1303.html:text/html}
+}
index aafeecc..08c0474 100644 (file)
@@ -515,13 +515,29 @@ selection on proteins substantially \citep{ngandu_extensive_2008}.
 A functional significance of the insulating RNA structure stems between the
 hypervariable loops has also been proposed previously
 \citep{watts_architecture_2009, sanjuan_interplay_2011} and conserved RNA
-structures exist in different parts of the HIV-1 genome. Since there are
-of course many ways to build an RNA stem in a particular location, we do
-not necessarily expect a strong signal of conservation in cross-sectional data. 
-Our analysis, however, is able to
-quantify the fitness effect of RNA structure within single infections and
-demonstrates how selection at synonymous sites can alter genetic diversity and
-dynamics. %FIXME insert citations and more discussion
+structures exist in different parts of the HIV-1 genome. Since there are of
+course many ways to build an RNA hairpin at a particular location, we do not
+necessarily expect a strong signal of conservation in cross-sectional data.
+Consistently, in a characterization of the SIV RNA structures via the SHAPE
+assay, it was recently shown that only the general pattern is shared with HIV,
+but the single base pairs are often discordant between the two viruses
+\citep{pollom_comparison_2013}. In fact, for each pairing-disrupting mutation in
+our dataset, we have looked for compensatory mutations at the partner site, but
+observed no effect. For these reasons, we do not believe that exact RNA pairings
+are evolutionary relevant, rather only the general architecture of different
+genomic regions (e.g. the V loops). Despite this flexibility in pairing, our
+analysis is able to quantify the fitness effect of RNA structure within single
+infections and demonstrates how selection at synonymous sites can alter genetic
+diversity and dynamics.
+
+In principle, the fitness effect of RNA structures in terms of replication
+capacity could be tested culturing \textit{in vitro} viruses with engineered
+modifications. This has been attempted recently, but no major fitness effect was
+measured \citep{knoepfel_role_2013}. There is no contradiction with our results,
+because we infer a selection coefficient for each mutation of the order of
+$-0.002$, which is only visible after hundreds of generations. Shorter
+experimental tests cannot detect such a subtle effect; our long-term
+longitudinal analysis is more sensitive in this respect.
 
 The observed hitchhiking highlights the importance of linkage due to
 infrequent recombination for the evolution of HIV-1
@@ -579,9 +595,9 @@ any additional benefit to the virus. Hence only one mutation will spread and the
 others will be driven out of the population although they transiently reach high
 frequencies. The rapid emergence of multiple escape mutations in the same
 epitope implies a large effective population size that explores all necessary point
-mutations rapidly. A similar point has been made recently by Boltz {\it et al.}
+mutations rapidly. A similar point has been made recently by several authors
 in the context of preexisting drug resistance mutations
-\citep{boltz_ultrasensitive_2012}. 
+\citep{boltz_ultrasensitive_2012, pennings_loss_2013}. 
 
 Our results emphasize the inadequacy of independent site models of HIV-1 evolution
 and the common assumption that selection is time independent or additive.