draft0
authorFabio Zanini <fabio.zanini@tuebingen.mpg.de>
Sun, 2 Dec 2012 02:00:19 +0000 (18:00 -0800)
committerFabio Zanini <fabio.zanini@tuebingen.mpg.de>
Sun, 2 Dec 2012 02:00:19 +0000 (18:00 -0800)
bib.bib
figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf
figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredients_3rddel_envnonenv_stopall.pdf
synmut.aux
synmut.bbl
synmut.blg
synmut.fdb_latexmk
synmut.fls
synmut.log
synmut.pdf [deleted file]
synmut.tex

diff --git a/bib.bib b/bib.bib
index 19abc26..7942b7f 100644 (file)
--- a/bib.bib
+++ b/bib.bib
@@ -4,14 +4,12 @@
        volume = {108},
        url = {http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=3078368&tool=pmcentrez&rendertype=abstract},
        doi = {10.1073/pnas.1102036108},
-       abstract = {{HIV} adaptation to a host in chronic infection is simulated by means of a Monte-Carlo algorithm that includes the evolutionary factors of mutation, positive selection with varying strength among sites, random genetic drift, linkage, and recombination. By comparing two sensitive measures of linkage disequilibrium {(LD)} and the number of diverse sites measured in simulation to patient data from one-time samples of pol gene obtained by single-genome sequencing from representative untreated patients, we estimate the effective recombination rate and the average selection coefficient to be on the order of 1\% per genome per generation (10(-5) per base per generation) and 0.5\%, respectively. The adaptation rate is twofold higher and fourfold lower than predicted in the absence of recombination and in the limit of very frequent recombination, respectively. The level of {LD} and the number of diverse sites observed in data also range between the values predicted in simulation for these two limiting cases. These results demonstrate the critical importance of finite population size, linkage, and recombination in {HIV} evolution.},
        number = {14},
        journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
        author = {Batorsky, Rebecca and Kearney, Mary F and Palmer, Sarah E and Maldarelli, Frank and Rouzine, Igor M and Coffin, John M},
        month = apr,
        year = {2011},
        pages = {5661--6},
-       file = {Batorsky et al_2011_Estimate of effective recombination rate and average selection coefficient for.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/H3TUFTGA/Batorsky et al_2011_Estimate of effective recombination rate and average selection coefficient for.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{bunnik_autologous_2008,
@@ -25,7 +23,6 @@
        author = {Bunnik, {E.M.} and Pisas, Linaida and Van Nuenen, {A.C.} and Schuitemaker, Hanneke},
        year = {2008},
        pages = {7932},
-       file = {Bunnik et al_2008_Autologous neutralizing humoral immunity and evolution of the viral envelope in.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/PU4HN6FE/Bunnik et al_2008_Autologous neutralizing humoral immunity and evolution of the viral envelope in.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{liu_selection_2006,
@@ -37,9 +34,7 @@
        journal = {Journal of virology},
        author = {Liu, Yi and {McNevin}, J. and Cao, Jianhong and Zhao, Hong and Genowati, Indira and Wong, Kim and {McLaughlin}, S. and {McSweyn}, {M.D.} and Diem, Kurt and Stevens, {C.E.} and others},
        year = {2006},
-       keywords = {Amino Acid Sequence, {CD8-Positive} T-Lymphocytes, {CD8-Positive} T-Lymphocytes: chemistry, {CD8-Positive} T-Lymphocytes: immunology, Epitopes, Epitopes: chemistry, Epitopes: immunology, {HIV-1}, {HIV-1:} physiology, {HIV} Infections, {HIV} Infections: genetics, {HIV} Infections: immunology, {HIV} Infections: metabolism, {HIV} Infections: virology, Humans, Molecular Sequence Data, Mutation, Mutation: genetics, Proteome, Proteome: chemistry, Proteome: genetics, Proteome: immunology, Proteome: metabolism, Selection, Genetic, Time Factors},
        pages = {9519},
-       file = {Liu et al_2006_Selection on the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteome following primary.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/NIG5HMZ6/Liu et al_2006_Selection on the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteome following primary.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{wilkinson_high-throughput_2008,
@@ -47,7 +42,6 @@
        volume = {6},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.0060096},
        doi = {10.1371/journal.pbio.0060096},
-       abstract = {Development of novel, quantitative, high-throughput {RNA} structure analysis tools allows the outline of structure-function relationships for the first 10\% of an {HIV} genome, discovery of structural differences between regulatory and coding regions, and analysis of protein-{RNA} interactions inside authentic virions.},
        number = {4},
        urldate = {2012-07-03},
        journal = {{PLoS} Biol},
@@ -55,7 +49,6 @@
        month = apr,
        year = {2008},
        pages = {e96},
-       file = {PLoS Full Text PDF:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/ADZTPT97/Wilkinson et al. - 2008 - High-Throughput SHAPE Analysis Reveals Structures .pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{neher_recombination_2010,
        volume = {6},
        url = {http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000660},
        doi = {10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000660},
-       abstract = {The evolutionary dynamics of {HIV} during the chronic phase of infection is driven by the host immune response and by selective pressures exerted through drug treatment. To understand and model the evolution of {HIV} quantitatively, the parameters governing genetic diversification and the strength of selection need to be known. While mutation rates can be measured in single replication cycles, the relevant effective recombination rate depends on the probability of coinfection of a cell with more than one virus and can only be inferred from population data. However, most population genetic estimators for recombination rates assume absence of selection and are hence of limited applicability to {HIV}, since positive and purifying selection are important in {HIV} evolution. Yet, little is known about the distribution of selection differentials between individual viruses and the impact of single polymorphisms on viral fitness. Here, we estimate the rate of recombination and the distribution of selection coefficients from time series sequence data tracking the evolution of {HIV} within single patients. By examining temporal changes in the genetic composition of the population, we estimate the effective recombination to be rho = 1.4+/-0.6 x 10(-5) recombinations per site and generation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the selection coefficients of at least 15\% of the observed non-synonymous polymorphisms exceed 0.8\% per generation. These results provide a basis for a more detailed understanding of the evolution of {HIV.} A particularly interesting case is evolution in response to drug treatment, where recombination can facilitate the rapid acquisition of multiple resistance mutations. With the methods developed here, more precise and more detailed studies will be possible as soon as data with higher time resolution and greater sample sizes are available.},
        number = {1},
        journal = {{PLoS} Comput Biol},
        author = {Neher, {R.A.} and Leitner, Thomas},
        month = jan,
        year = {2010},
-       keywords = {Algorithms, Cluster Analysis, Computational Biology, Computational Biology: methods, Evolution, genetic, Genetic: physiology, {HIV}, {HIV:} genetics, {HIV} Infections, {HIV} Infections: genetics, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Host-Pathogen Interactions: genetics, Molecular, Mutation, Recombination, Selection},
        pages = {e1000660},
-       file = {Neher_Leitner_2010_Recombination rate and selection strength in HIV intra-patient evolution.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/VBB3QFKT/Neher_Leitner_2010_Recombination rate and selection strength in HIV intra-patient evolution.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{neher_genetic_2011,
        author = {Neher, Richard A and Shraiman, Boris},
        year = {2011},
        pages = {975--996},
-       file = {Neher_Shraiman_2011_Genetic Draft and Quasi-Neutrality in Large Facultatively Sexual Populations.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/5METJEHW/Neher_Shraiman_2011_Genetic Draft and Quasi-Neutrality in Large Facultatively Sexual Populations.pdf:application/pdf}
+},
+
+@article{perelson_hiv-1_1996,
+       title = {HIV-1 dynamics in vivo: virion clearance rate, infected cell life-span, and viral generation time.},
+       volume = {271},
+       url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8599114},
+       number = {5255},
+       journal = {Science {(New York, N.Y.)}},
+       author = {Perelson, a S and Neumann, a U and Markowitz, M and Leonard, J M and Ho, D D},
+       month = mar,
+       year = {1996},
+       pages = {1582--6},
 },
 
 @article{shankarappa_consistent_1999,
@@ -95,7 +96,6 @@
        author = {Shankarappa, R. and Margolick, {J.B.} and Gange, {S.J.} and Rodrigo, {A.G.} and Upchurch, David and Farzadegan, Homayoon and Gupta, Phalguni and Rinaldo, {C.R.} and Learn, {G.H.} and He, X. and others},
        year = {1999},
        pages = {10489},
-       file = {Shankarappa et al_1999_Consistent viral evolutionary changes associated with the progression of human.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/84RWMUW8/Shankarappa et al_1999_Consistent viral evolutionary changes associated with the progression of human.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{watts_architecture_2009,
        issn = {0028-0836},
        url = {http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v460/n7256/full/nature08237.html},
        doi = {10.1038/nature08237},
-       abstract = {Single-stranded {RNA} viruses encompass broad classes of infectious agents and cause the common cold, cancer, {AIDS} and other serious health threats. Viral replication is regulated at many levels, including the use of conserved genomic {RNA} structures. Most potential regulatory elements in viral {RNA} genomes are uncharacterized. Here we report the structure of an entire {HIV-1} genome at single nucleotide resolution using {SHAPE}, a high-throughput {RNA} analysis technology. The genome encodes protein structure at two levels. In addition to the correspondence between {RNA} and protein primary sequences, a correlation exists between high levels of {RNA} structure and sequences that encode inter-domain loops in {HIV} proteins. This correlation suggests that {RNA} structure modulates ribosome elongation to promote native protein folding. Some simple genome elements previously shown to be important, including the ribosomal gag-pol frameshift stem-loop, are components of larger {RNA} motifs. We also identify organizational principles for unstructured {RNA} regions, including splice site acceptors and hypervariable regions. These results emphasize that the {HIV-1} genome and, potentially, many coding {RNAs} are punctuated by previously unrecognized regulatory motifs and that extensive {RNA} structure constitutes an important component of the genetic code.},
        language = {en},
        number = {7256},
        urldate = {2012-07-01},
        author = {Watts, Joseph M. and Dang, Kristen K. and Gorelick, Robert J. and Leonard, Christopher W. and Jr, Julian W. Bess and Swanstrom, Ronald and Burch, Christina L. and Weeks, Kevin M.},
        month = aug,
        year = {2009},
-       keywords = {astronomy, astrophysics, biochemistry, bioinformatics, biology, biotechnology, cancer, cell cycle, cell signalling, climate change, computational biology, development, developmental biology, {DNA}, drug discovery, earth science, ecology, environmental science, Evolution, evolutionary biology, functional genomics, genetics, genomics, geophysics, Immunology, interdisciplinary science, life, marine biology, materials science, Medical research, medicine, metabolomics, molecular biology, molecular interactions, nanotechnology, Nature, neurobiology, neuroscience, palaeobiology, pharmacology, physics, proteomics, quantum physics, {RNA}, science, science news, science policy, signal transduction, structural biology, systems biology, transcriptomics},
        pages = {711--716},
-       file = {Full Text PDF:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/T7UGN8ID/Watts et al. - 2009 - Architecture and secondary structure of an entire .pdf:application/pdf}
+},
+
+@article{forsdyke_reciprocal_1995,
+       title = {Reciprocal relationship between stem-loop potential and substitution density in retroviral quasispecies under positive Darwinian selection},
+       volume = {41},
+       issn = {0022-2844, 1432-1432},
+       url = {http://www.springerlink.com/content/n7621n18505m418m/},
+       doi = {10.1007/BF00173184},
+       number = {6},
+       urldate = {2012-07-06},
+       journal = {Journal of Molecular Evolution},
+       author = {Forsdyke, {D.R.}},
+       month = dec,
+       year = {1995},
+},
+
+@article{sanjuan_interplay_2011,
+       title = {Interplay between RNA Structure and Protein Evolution in HIV-1},
+       volume = {28},
+       issn = {0737-4038, 1537-1719},
+       url = {http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/28/4/1333},
+       doi = {10.1093/molbev/msq329},
+       language = {en},
+       number = {4},
+       urldate = {2012-08-14},
+       journal = {Molecular Biology and Evolution},
+       author = {Sanjuan, Rafael and Borderia, Antonio V.},
+       month = apr,
+       year = {2011},
+       pages = {1333--1338},
 },
 
 @article{fernandes_hiv-1_2012,
        month = jan,
        year = {2012},
        pages = {4--9},
-       file = {Fernandes et al_2012_The HIV-1 rev response element.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/SZK3ZGCG/Fernandes et al_2012_The HIV-1 rev response element.pdf:application/pdf;Landes Bioscience Journals: RNA Biology:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/RC8QX4B7/18178.html:text/html}
+},
+
+@article{coleman_virus_2008,
+       title = {Virus Attenuation by Genome-Scale Changes in Codon Pair Bias},
+       volume = {320},
+       issn = {0036-8075, 1095-9203},
+       url = {http://www.sciencemag.org/content/320/5884/1784},
+       doi = {10.1126/science.1155761},
+       language = {en},
+       number = {5884},
+       urldate = {2012-10-08},
+       journal = {Science},
+       author = {Coleman, J. Robert and Papamichail, Dimitris and Skiena, Steven and Futcher, Bruce and Wimmer, Eckard and Mueller, Steffen},
+       month = jun,
+       year = {2008},
+       pages = {1784--1787},
 },
 
 @article{ngumbela_quantitative_2008,
        volume = {3},
        url = {http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0002356},
        doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0002356},
-       abstract = {{BackgroundThe} sequences of wild-isolate strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 {(HIV-1)} are characterized by low {GC} content and suboptimal codon usage. Codon optimization of {DNA} vectors can enhance protein expression both by enhancing translational efficiency, and by altering {RNA} stability and export. Although gag codon optimization is widely used in {DNA} vectors and experimental vaccines, the actual effect of altered codon usage on gag translational efficiency has not been {quantified.Methodology} and Principal {FindingsTo} quantify translational efficiency of gag {mRNA} in live T cells, we transfected Jurkat cells with increasing doses of capped, polyadenylated synthetic {mRNA} corresponding to wildtype or codon-optimized gag sequences, measured Gag production by quantitative {ELISA} and flow cytometry, and estimated the translational efficiency of each transcript as pg of Gag antigen produced per µg of input {mRNA.} We found that codon optimization yielded a small increase in gag translational efficiency (approximately 1.6 fold). In contrast when cells were transfected with {DNA} vectors requiring nuclear transcription and processing of gag {mRNA}, codon optimization resulted in a very large enhancement of Gag {production.ConclusionsWe} conclude that suboptimal codon usage by {HIV-1} results in only a slight loss of gag translational efficiency per se, with the vast majority of enhancement in protein expression from {DNA} vectors due to altered processing and export of nuclear {RNA.}},
        number = {6},
        urldate = {2012-10-08},
        journal = {{PLoS} {ONE}},
        month = jun,
        year = {2008},
        pages = {e2356},
-       file = {Ngumbela et al_2008_Quantitative Effect of Suboptimal Codon Usage on Translational Efficiency of.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/4HIE4DTU/Ngumbela et al_2008_Quantitative Effect of Suboptimal Codon Usage on Translational Efficiency of.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{plotkin_codon_2003,
        issn = {0027-8424, 1091-6490},
        url = {http://www.pnas.org/content/100/12/7152},
        doi = {10.1073/pnas.1132114100},
-       abstract = {Although the surface proteins of human influenza A virus evolve rapidly and continually produce antigenic variants, the internal viral genes acquire mutations very gradually. In this paper, we analyze the sequence evolution of three influenza A genes over the past two decades. We study codon usage as a discriminating signature of gene- and even residue-specific diversifying and purifying selection. Nonrandom codon choice can increase or decrease the effective local substitution rate. We demonstrate that the codons of hemagglutinin, particularly those in the antibody-combining regions, are significantly biased toward substitutional point mutations relative to the codons of other influenza virus genes. We discuss the evolutionary interpretation and implications of these biases for hemagglutinin's antigenic evolution. We also introduce information-theoretic methods that use sequence data to detect regions of recent positive selection and potential protein conformational changes.},
        language = {en},
        number = {12},
        urldate = {2012-10-17},
        month = jun,
        year = {2003},
        pages = {7152--7157},
-       file = {Plotkin_Dushoff_2003_Codon bias and frequency-dependent selection on the hemagglutinin epitopes of.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/5T9U4ZV8/Plotkin_Dushoff_2003_Codon bias and frequency-dependent selection on the hemagglutinin epitopes of.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/7W55GXAK/7152.html:text/html}
 },
 
 @article{jenkins_extent_2003,
        issn = {0168-1702},
        url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016817020200309X},
        doi = {10.1016/S0168-1702(02)00309-X},
-       abstract = {Revealing the determinants of codon usage bias is central to the understanding of factors governing viral evolution. Herein, we report the results of a survey of codon usage bias in a wide range of genetically and ecologically diverse human {RNA} viruses. This analysis showed that the overall extent of codon usage bias in {RNA} viruses is low and that there is little variation in bias between genes. Furthermore, the strong correlation between base and dinucleotide composition and codon usage bias suggested that mutation pressure rather than natural (translational) selection is the most important determinant of the codon bias observed. However, we also detected correlations between codon usage bias and some characteristics of viral genome structure and ecology, with increased bias in segmented and aerosol-transmitted viruses and decreased bias in vector-borne viruses. This suggests that translational selection may also have some influence in shaping codon usage bias.},
        number = {1},
        urldate = {2012-10-19},
        journal = {Virus Research},
        year = {2003},
        keywords = {Base composition, codon usage bias, Dinucleotide, Mutation pressure, Translational selection},
        pages = {1--7},
-       file = {Jenkins_Holmes_2003_The extent of codon usage bias in human RNA viruses and its evolutionary origin.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/TQQ8N6Q5/Jenkins_Holmes_2003_The extent of codon usage bias in human RNA viruses and its evolutionary origin.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/TIQC6BSM/S016817020200309X.html:text/html}
+},
+
+@article{bronson_nucleotide_1994,
+       title = {Nucleotide composition as a driving force in the evolution of retroviruses},
+       volume = {38},
+       issn = {0022-2844, 1432-1432},
+       url = {http://www.springerlink.com/content/c7m6653t2751w071/},
+       doi = {10.1007/BF00178851},
+       number = {5},
+       urldate = {2012-10-22},
+       journal = {Journal of Molecular Evolution},
+       author = {Bronson, Edward C. and Anderson, John N.},
+       month = may,
+       year = {1994},
+       pages = {506--532},
 },
 
 @article{li_codon-usage-based_2012,
        issn = {0028-0836},
        url = {http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature11433.html?WT.ec_id=NATURE-20120927},
        doi = {10.1038/nature11433},
-       abstract = {In mammals, one of the most pronounced consequences of viral infection is the induction of type I interferons, cytokines with potent antiviral activity. Schlafen {(Slfn)} genes are a subset of interferon-stimulated early response genes {(ISGs)} that are also induced directly by pathogens via the interferon regulatory factor 3 {(IRF3)} pathway. However, many {ISGs} are of unknown or incompletely understood function. Here we show that human {SLFN11} potently and specifically abrogates the production of retroviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus 1 {(HIV-1).} Our study revealed that {SLFN11} has no effect on the early steps of the retroviral infection cycle, including reverse transcription, integration and transcription. Rather, {SLFN11} acts at the late stage of virus production by selectively inhibiting the expression of viral proteins in a codon-usage-dependent manner. We further find that {SLFN11} binds transfer {RNA}, and counteracts changes in the {tRNA} pool elicited by the presence of {HIV.} Our studies identified a novel antiviral mechanism within the innate immune response, in which {SLFN11} selectively inhibits viral protein synthesis in {HIV-infected} cells by means of codon-bias discrimination.},
        language = {en},
        urldate = {2012-11-05},
        journal = {Nature},
        author = {Li, Manqing and Kao, Elaine and Gao, Xia and Sandig, Hilary and Limmer, Kirsten and Pavon-Eternod, Mariana and Jones, Thomas E. and Landry, Sebastien and Pan, Tao and Weitzman, Matthew D. and David, Michael},
        year = {2012},
-       keywords = {Cell biology, Immunology, Medical research, Virology},
-       file = {Li et al_2012_Codon-usage-based inhibition of HIV protein synthesis by human schlafen 11.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/A34V5IJT/Li et al_2012_Codon-usage-based inhibition of HIV protein synthesis by human schlafen 11.pdf:application/pdf}
+},
+
+@article{boltz_ultrasensitive_2012,
+       title = {Ultrasensitive Allele-Specific {PCR} Reveals Rare Preexisting Drug-Resistant Variants and a Large Replicating Virus Population in Macaques Infected with a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reverse Transcriptase},
+       volume = {86},
+       issn = {0022-{538X}, 1098-5514},
+       url = {http://jvi.asm.org/content/86/23/12525},
+       doi = {10.1128/JVI.01963-12},
+       language = {en},
+       number = {23},
+       urldate = {2012-11-08},
+       journal = {Journal of Virology},
+       author = {Boltz, Valerie F. and Ambrose, Zandrea and Kearney, Mary F. and Shao, Wei and {KewalRamani}, Vineet N. and Maldarelli, Frank and Mellors, John W. and Coffin, John M.},
+       month = dec,
+       year = {2012},
+       pages = {12525--12530},
 },
 
 @article{kwong_hiv-1_2002,
        volume = {420},
        url = {http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v420/n6916/abs/nature01188.html},
        doi = {10.1038/nature01188},
-       abstract = {The ability of human immunodeficiency virus {(HIV-1)} to persist and cause {AIDS} is dependent on its avoidance of antibody-mediated neutralization. The virus elicits abundant, envelope-directed antibodies that have little neutralization capacity. This lack of neutralization is paradoxical, given the functional conservation and exposure of receptor-binding sites on the gp120 envelope glycoprotein, which are larger than the typical antibody footprint and should therefore be accessible for antibody binding. Because gp120–receptor interactions involve conformational reorganization, we measured the entropies of binding for 20 gp120-reactive antibodies. Here we show that recognition by receptor-binding-site antibodies induces conformational change. Correlation with neutralization potency and analysis of receptor–antibody thermodynamic cycles suggested a receptor-binding-site 'conformational masking' mechanism of neutralization escape. To understand how such an escape mechanism would be compatible with virus–receptor interactions, we tested a soluble dodecameric receptor molecule and found that it neutralized primary {HIV-1} isolates with great potency, showing that simultaneous binding of viral envelope glycoproteins by multiple receptors creates sufficient avidity to compensate for such masking. Because this solution is available for cell-surface receptors but not for most antibodies, conformational masking enables {HIV-1} to maintain receptor binding and simultaneously to resist neutralization.},
        number = {6916},
        urldate = {2012-11-22},
        journal = {Nature},
        author = {Kwong, Peter D. and Doyle, Michael L. and Casper, David J. and Cicala, Claudia and Leavitt, Stephanie A. and Majeed, Shahzad and Steenbeke, Tavis D. and Venturi, Miro and Chaiken, Irwin and Fung, Michael and Katinger, Hermann and Parren, Paul W. I. H. and Robinson, James and Ryk, Donald Van and Wang, Liping and Burton, Dennis R. and Freire, Ernesto and Wyatt, Richard and Sodroski, Joseph and Hendrickson, Wayne A. and Arthos, James},
        month = dec,
        year = {2002},
-       keywords = {astronomy, astrophysics, biochemistry, bioinformatics, biology, biotechnology, cancer, cell cycle, cell signalling, climate change, computational biology, development, developmental biology, {DNA}, drug discovery, earth science, ecology, environmental science, Evolution, evolutionary biology, functional genomics, genetics, genomics, geophysics, Immunology, interdisciplinary science, life, marine biology, materials science, Medical research, medicine, metabolomics, molecular biology, molecular interactions, nanotechnology, Nature, neurobiology, neuroscience, palaeobiology, pharmacology, physics, proteomics, quantum physics, {RNA}, science, science news, science policy, signal transduction, structural biology, systems biology, transcriptomics},
        pages = {678},
-       file = {Kwong et al_2002_HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralization through conformational masking of.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/FV6ASWG5/Kwong et al_2002_HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralization through conformational masking of.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{pantaleo_immunopathogenesis_1996,
        volume = {50},
        url = {http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.micro.50.1.825},
        doi = {10.1146/annurev.micro.50.1.825},
-       abstract = {The rate of progression of {HIV} disease may be substantially different among {HIV-infected} individuals. Following infection of the host with any virus, the delicate balance between virus replication and the immune response to the virus determines both the outcome of the infection, i.e. the persistence versus elimination of the virus, and the different rates of progression. During primary {HIV} infection, a burst of viremia occurs that disseminates virus to the lymphoid organs. A potent immune response ensues that substantially, but usually not completely, curtails virus replication. This inability of the immune system to completely eliminate the virus leads to establishment of chronic, persistent infection that over time leads to profound immunosuppression. The potential mechanisms of virus escape from an otherwise effective immune response have been investigated. Clonal deletion of {HIV-specific} cytotoxic T-cell clones and sequestration of virus-specific cytotoxic cells away from the major site of virus replication represent important mechanisms of virus escape from the immune response that favor persistence of {HIV.} Qualitative differences in the primary immune response to {HIV} (i.e. mobilization of a restricted versus broader T-cell receptor repertoire) are associated with different rates of disease progression. Therefore, the initial interaction between the virus and immune system of the host is critical for the subsequent clinical outcome.},
        number = {1},
        urldate = {2012-11-28},
        journal = {Annual Review of Microbiology},
        author = {Pantaleo, G. and Fauci, A. S.},
        year = {1996},
        note = {{PMID:} 8905100},
-       keywords = {immunologic events, mechanisms of virus escape, primary infection, virologic events},
        pages = {825--854},
-       file = {Pantaleo_Fauci_1996_Immunopathogenesis of Hiv Infection1.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/6K23TVM3/Pantaleo_Fauci_1996_Immunopathogenesis of Hiv Infection1.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{barat_interaction_1991,
        issn = {0305-1048, 1362-4962},
        url = {http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/content/19/4/751},
        doi = {10.1093/nar/19.4.751},
-       abstract = {Using synthetic oligonucleotides, a gene encoding the {HIV-1} replication primer, {tRNALys},3, was constructed and placed downstream from a bacteriophage T7 promoter. In vitro transcription of this gene yielded a form of {tRNALys},3 which lacks the modified bases characteristic of the natural species and the 3′-G-A-dinucieotide. Synthetic {tRNALys},3 annealed to a pbs- {HIV1} {RNA} template can prime {cDNA} synthesis catalysed by recombinant {HIV-1} reverse transcriptase. Trans-{DDP} crosslinking indicates that this synthetic {tRNA} is still capable of interacting with {HIV-1} {RT} via a 12-nucleotide portion encompassing the anticodon domain. Gel-mobility shift and competition analyses imply that the affinity of synthetic {tRNA} for {RT} is reduced. In contrast to earlier observations, synthetic {tRNA} is readily competed from {RT} by natural {tRNAPro.} The reduced affinity of synthetic {tRNALys},3 for {RT} is not appreciably affected by mutations in positions within the loop of the anticodon domain. These results would imply that the overall structure of the anticodon domain of {tRNALys},3 is an important factor in its recognition by {HIV-1} {RT.} In addition, modified bases within this, although not absolutely required, would appear to make a significant contribution to the enhanced stability of the ribonucleoprotein complex.},
        language = {en},
        number = {4},
        urldate = {2012-11-28},
        month = feb,
        year = {1991},
        pages = {751--757},
-       file = {Barat et al_1991_Interaction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with a synthetic form of its.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/DE7QDN23/Barat et al_1991_Interaction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with a synthetic form of its.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/IDQCT4AN/751.html:text/html}
 },
 
 @article{barat_hiv-1_1989,
        volume = {8},
        issn = {0261-4189},
        url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC401457/},
-       abstract = {The virion cores of the replication competent type 1 human immunodeficiency virus {(HIV-1)}, a retrovirus, contain and {RNA} genome associated with nucleocapsid {(NC)} and reverse transcriptase {(RT} p66/p51) molecules. In vitro reconstructions of these complexes with purified components show that {NC} is required for efficient annealing of the primer {tRNALys},3. In the absence of {NC}, {HIV-1} {RT} is unable to retrotranscribe the viral {RNA} template from the {tRNA} primer. We demonstrate that the {HIV-1} {RT} p66/p51 specifically binds to its cognate primer {tRNALys},3 even in the presence of a 100-fold molar excess of other {tRNAs.} Cross-linking analysis of this interaction locates the contact site to a region within the heavily modified anti-codon domain of {tRNALys},3.},
        number = {11},
        urldate = {2012-11-28},
        journal = {The {EMBO} Journal},
        note = {{PMID:} 2479543
 {PMCID:} {PMC401457}},
        pages = {3279--3285},
-       file = {Barat et al_1989_HIV-1 reverse transcriptase specifically interacts with the anticodon domain of.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/G7ZXPA5K/Barat et al_1989_HIV-1 reverse transcriptase specifically interacts with the anticodon domain of.pdf:application/pdf}
 },
 
 @article{paillart_vitro_2002,
        issn = {0021-9258, 1083-{351X}},
        url = {http://www.jbc.org/content/277/8/5995},
        doi = {10.1074/jbc.M108972200},
-       abstract = {The 5′-untranslated leader region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 {(HIV-1)} {RNA} contains multiple signals that control distinct steps of the viral replication cycle such as transcription, reverse transcription, genomic {RNA} dimerization, splicing, and packaging. It is likely that fine tuned coordinated regulation of these functions is achieved through specific {RNA-protein} and {RNA-RNA} interactions. In a search for cis-acting elements important for the tertiary structure of the 5′-untranslated region of {HIV-1} genomic {RNA}, we identified, by ladder selection experiments, a short stretch of nucleotides directly downstream of the {poly(A)} signal that interacts with a nucleotide sequence located in the matrix region. Confirmation of the sequence of the interacting sites was obtained by partial or complete inhibition of this interaction by antisense oligonucleotides and by nucleotide substitutions. In the wild type {RNA}, this long range interaction was intramolecular, since no intermolecular {RNA} association was detected by gel electrophoresis with an {RNA} mutated in the dimerization initiation site and containing both sequences involved in the tertiary interaction. Moreover, the functional importance of this interaction is supported by its conservation in all {HIV-1} isolates as well as in {HIV-2} and simian immunodeficiency virus. Our results raise the possibility that this long range {RNA-RNA} interaction might be involved in the full-length genomic {RNA} selection during packaging, repression of the 5′ polyadenylation signal, and/or splicing regulation.},
        language = {en},
        number = {8},
        urldate = {2012-11-28},
        month = feb,
        year = {2002},
        pages = {5995--6004},
-       file = {Paillart et al_2002_In Vitro Evidence for a Long Range Pseudoknot in the 5′-Untranslated and Matrix.pdf:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/W9QV5ZQG/Paillart et al_2002_In Vitro Evidence for a Long Range Pseudoknot in the 5′-Untranslated and Matrix.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/home/fabio/university/papers/zotero/storage/ESVZJ42C/5995.html:text/html}
 },
 
 @book{ewens_mathematical_2004,
        title = {Mathematical Population Genetics: I. Theoretical Introduction},
        isbn = {9780387201917},
        shorttitle = {Mathematical Population Genetics},
-       abstract = {This is the first of a planned two-volume work discussing the mathematical aspects of population genetics with an emphasis on evolutionary theory. This volume draws heavily from the author’s 1979 classic, but it has been revised and expanded to include recent topics which follow naturally from the treatment in the earlier edition, such as the theory of molecular population genetics.},
        language = {en},
        publisher = {Springer},
        author = {Ewens, Warren J.},
        month = jan,
        year = {2004},
-       keywords = {Mathematics / Applied, Science / Life Sciences / Evolution}
-}
\ No newline at end of file
+},
+
+@article{zanini_ffpopsim:_2012,
+       title = {{FFPopSim:} An efficient forward simulation package for the evolution of large populations},
+       issn = {1367-4803, 1460-2059},
+       shorttitle = {{FFPopSim}},
+       url = {http://bioinformatics.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/10/24/bioinformatics.bts633},
+       doi = {10.1093/bioinformatics/bts633},
+       language = {en},
+       urldate = {2012-12-01},
+       journal = {Bioinformatics},
+       author = {Zanini, Fabio and Neher, Richard A.},
+       month = oct,
+       year = {2012},
+},
+
+@article{desai_beneficial_2007,
+       title = {Beneficial mutation selection balance and the effect of linkage on positive selection.},
+       volume = {176},
+       doi = {10.1534/genetics.106.067678},
+       number = {3},
+       journal = {Genetics},
+       author = {Desai, Michael M and Fisher, Daniel S},
+       month = jul,
+       year = {2007},
+       pages = {1759--98},
+},
+
+@article{richman_rapid_2003,
+       title = {Rapid evolution of the neutralizing antibody response to {HIV} type 1 infection},
+       volume = {100},
+       issn = {0027-8424, 1091-6490},
+       url = {http://www.pnas.org/content/100/7/4144},
+       doi = {10.1073/pnas.0630530100},
+       number = {7},
+       urldate = {2012-11-22},
+       journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
+       author = {Richman, Douglas D. and Wrin, Terri and Little, Susan J. and Petropoulos, Christos J.},
+       month = apr,
+       year = {2003},
+       pages = {4144--4149},
+},
+
+@article{moore_limited_2009,
+       title = {Limited Neutralizing Antibody Specificities Drive Neutralization Escape in Early HIV-1 Subtype C Infection},
+       volume = {5},
+       url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000598},
+       doi = {10.1371/journal.ppat.1000598},
+       number = {9},
+       urldate = {2012-08-17},
+       journal = {PLoS Pathog},
+       author = {Moore, Penny L. and Ranchobe, Nthabeleng and Lambson, Bronwen E. and Gray, Elin S. and Cave, Eleanor and Abrahams, Melissa-Rose and Bandawe, Gama and Mlisana, Koleka and Abdool Karim, Salim S. and Williamson, Carolyn and Morris, Lynn and the {CAPRISA} 002 study and the {NIAID} Center for {HIV/AIDS} Vaccine Immunology {(CHAVI)}},
+       month = sep,
+       year = {2009},
+       pages = {e1000598},
+},
+
+@article{brenner_high_2007,
+       title = {High Rates of Forward Transmission Events after Acute/Early HIV-1 Infection},
+       volume = {195},
+       issn = {0022-1899, 1537-6613},
+       url = {http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/195/7/951},
+       doi = {10.1086/512088},
+       language = {en},
+       number = {7},
+       urldate = {2012-12-02},
+       journal = {Journal of Infectious Diseases},
+       author = {Brenner, Bluma G. and Roger, Michel and Routy, Jean-Pierre and Moisi, Daniela and Ntemgwa, Michel and Matte, Claudine and Baril, Jean-Guy and Thomas, Rejean and Rouleau, Danielle and Bruneau, Julie and Leblanc, Roger and Legault, Mario and Tremblay, Cecile and Charest, Hugues and Wainberg, Mark A.},
+       month = apr,
+       year = {2007},
+       pages = {951--959},
+},
+
+@article{strelkowa_clonal_2012,
+       title = {Clonal Interference in the Evolution of Influenza},
+       issn = {0016-6731, 1943-2631},
+       url = {http://www.genetics.org/content/early/2012/07/20/genetics.112.143396},
+       doi = {10.1534/genetics.112.143396},
+       language = {en},
+       urldate = {2012-08-01},
+       journal = {Genetics},
+       author = {Strelkowa, Natalja and Laessig, Michael},
+       month = jul,
+       year = {2012},
+}
index 63f15de..f073fab 100644 (file)
Binary files a/figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf and b/figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf differ
index 0e92dfe..2f70162 100644 (file)
Binary files a/figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredients_3rddel_envnonenv_stopall.pdf and b/figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredients_3rddel_envnonenv_stopall.pdf differ
index 4b0b62d..a49e779 100644 (file)
 \citation{liu_selection_2006}
 \citation{shankarappa_consistent_1999}
 \citation{shankarappa_consistent_1999}
+\citation{neher_recombination_2010}
+\citation{neher_genetic_2011}
+\citation{boltz_ultrasensitive_2012}
+\citation{shankarappa_consistent_1999}
+\citation{bunnik_autologous_2008}
 \citation{shankarappa_consistent_1999}
 \citation{bunnik_autologous_2008}
+\@writefile{lof}{\contentsline {figure}{\numberline {1}{\ignorespaces Allele frequency trajectories of typical patient, C3-V5, nonsynonymous (solid) and synonymous mutations (dashed lines). Most synonymous mutations are not fixed. Colors are set according to the position of the site along the C3-V5 region (red to blue). Data from Ref.~\cite  {shankarappa_consistent_1999}.\relax }}{3}{figure.caption.1}}
+\providecommand*\caption@xref[2]{\@setref\relax\@undefined{#1}}
+\newlabel{fig:aft}{{1}{3}{Allele frequency trajectories of typical patient, C3-V5, nonsynonymous (solid) and synonymous mutations (dashed lines). Most synonymous mutations are not fixed. Colors are set according to the position of the site along the C3-V5 region (red to blue). Data from Ref.~\cite {shankarappa_consistent_1999}.\relax \relax }{figure.caption.1}{}}
+\@writefile{toc}{\contentsline {section}{\numberline {2}Results}{3}{section.2}}
 \citation{shankarappa_consistent_1999}
 \citation{bunnik_autologous_2008}
+\citation{perelson_hiv-1_1996}
+\citation{boltz_ultrasensitive_2012}
+\@writefile{lof}{\contentsline {figure}{\numberline {2}{\ignorespaces Left panel: fixation probability of derived synonymous alleles is strongly suppressed in C3-V5 versus other parts of the {\it  env} gene, and of nonsynonymous ones. Right panel: especially hard is fixation of new alleles in conserved regions flanking the V loops. The black dashed line is the prediction from neutral theory, for comparison purposes. Data from Refs.~\cite  {shankarappa_consistent_1999, bunnik_autologous_2008}.\relax }}{4}{figure.caption.2}}
+\newlabel{fig:fixp}{{2}{4}{Left panel: fixation probability of derived synonymous alleles is strongly suppressed in C3-V5 versus other parts of the {\it env} gene, and of nonsynonymous ones. Right panel: especially hard is fixation of new alleles in conserved regions flanking the V loops. The black dashed line is the prediction from neutral theory, for comparison purposes. Data from Refs.~\cite {shankarappa_consistent_1999, bunnik_autologous_2008}.\relax \relax }{figure.caption.2}{}}
+\citation{neher_recombination_2010}
+\@writefile{lof}{\contentsline {figure}{\numberline {3}{\ignorespaces Fixation or extinction times for synonymous alleles starting from intermediate frequencies. The colored bands are the final fixation probabilities expected from neutral theory; the observed alleles are fixed less frequently than expected. The timescale of fixation/extinction is approximately 500 days, corresponding to a selective effect of $\sim -0.001$.\relax }}{5}{figure.caption.3}}
+\newlabel{fig:fixtimes}{{3}{5}{Fixation or extinction times for synonymous alleles starting from intermediate frequencies. The colored bands are the final fixation probabilities expected from neutral theory; the observed alleles are fixed less frequently than expected. The timescale of fixation/extinction is approximately 500 days, corresponding to a selective effect of $\sim -0.001$.\relax \relax }{figure.caption.3}{}}
+\citation{watts_architecture_2009}
+\citation{forsdyke_reciprocal_1995}
+\citation{watts_architecture_2009}
+\citation{watts_architecture_2009}
+\citation{sanjuan_interplay_2011}
+\citation{watts_architecture_2009}
 \citation{watts_architecture_2009}
 \citation{shankarappa_consistent_1999}
 \citation{bunnik_autologous_2008}
 \citation{shankarappa_consistent_1999}
 \citation{bunnik_autologous_2008}
 \citation{liu_selection_2006}
+\citation{watts_architecture_2009}
+\citation{jenkins_extent_2003}
+\citation{li_codon-usage-based_2012}
+\citation{ngumbela_quantitative_2008}
+\citation{coleman_virus_2008}
+\citation{bronson_nucleotide_1994}
+\@writefile{lof}{\contentsline {figure}{\numberline {4}{\ignorespaces Watts et al. have measured the reactivity of HIV nucleotides to {\it  in vitro} chemical attack and shown that some nucleotides are more likely to be involved in RNA secondary folds. C1-C5 regions, in particular, show conserved stem-loop structures~\citep  {watts_architecture_2009}. We show that among all derived alleles in those regions reaching frequencies of order one, there is a negative correlation between fixation and involvement in a base pairing in a RNA stem (left panel). The rest of the genome does not show any correlation (right panel). There might be too few silent polymorphisms in the first place, or the signal might be masked by non-functional RNA structures. Data from Refs.~\cite  {shankarappa_consistent_1999, bunnik_autologous_2008, liu_selection_2006}.\relax }}{7}{figure.caption.4}}
+\newlabel{fig:SHAPE}{{4}{7}{Watts et al. have measured the reactivity of HIV nucleotides to {\it in vitro} chemical attack and shown that some nucleotides are more likely to be involved in RNA secondary folds. C1-C5 regions, in particular, show conserved stem-loop structures~\citep {watts_architecture_2009}. We show that among all derived alleles in those regions reaching frequencies of order one, there is a negative correlation between fixation and involvement in a base pairing in a RNA stem (left panel). The rest of the genome does not show any correlation (right panel). There might be too few silent polymorphisms in the first place, or the signal might be masked by non-functional RNA structures. Data from Refs.~\cite {shankarappa_consistent_1999, bunnik_autologous_2008, liu_selection_2006}.\relax \relax }{figure.caption.4}{}}
+\citation{zanini_ffpopsim:_2012}
+\citation{desai_beneficial_2007}
+\@writefile{lof}{\contentsline {figure}{\numberline {5}{\ignorespaces Simulations show that the suppression of fixation probability can be generated by linkage to sweeping nonsynonymous alleles nearby. Two possible scenarios are competition between escape mutants (left panel) and time-dependent selection due to immune sytem recognition (right panel).\relax }}{9}{figure.caption.5}}
+\newlabel{fig:simfixp}{{5}{9}{Simulations show that the suppression of fixation probability can be generated by linkage to sweeping nonsynonymous alleles nearby. Two possible scenarios are competition between escape mutants (left panel) and time-dependent selection due to immune sytem recognition (right panel).\relax \relax }{figure.caption.5}{}}
+\citation{richman_rapid_2003}
+\citation{bunnik_autologous_2008}
+\citation{moore_limited_2009}
+\@writefile{lof}{\contentsline {figure}{\numberline {6}{\ignorespaces Simulations on the escape competition scenario show that the density of selective sweeps and the size of the deleterious effects of synonymous mutations are the main driving forces of the phenomenon. A convex fixation probability is recovered, as seen in the data, along the diagonal (left panel): more dense sweeps can support more deleterious linked mutations. The density of sweeps is limited, however, by the nonsynonymous fixation probability, which is quite close to neutrality (right panel). Moreover, strong competition between escape mutants is required, so that several escape mutants are ``found'' by HIV within a few months of antibody production.\relax }}{10}{figure.caption.6}}
+\newlabel{fig:simheat}{{6}{10}{Simulations on the escape competition scenario show that the density of selective sweeps and the size of the deleterious effects of synonymous mutations are the main driving forces of the phenomenon. A convex fixation probability is recovered, as seen in the data, along the diagonal (left panel): more dense sweeps can support more deleterious linked mutations. The density of sweeps is limited, however, by the nonsynonymous fixation probability, which is quite close to neutrality (right panel). Moreover, strong competition between escape mutants is required, so that several escape mutants are ``found'' by HIV within a few months of antibody production.\relax \relax }{figure.caption.6}{}}
+\citation{fernandes_hiv-1_2012}
+\citation{paillart_vitro_2002}
+\citation{brenner_high_2007}
+\citation{watts_architecture_2009}
+\citation{sanjuan_interplay_2011}
+\citation{sanjuan_interplay_2011}
+\@writefile{toc}{\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3}Discussion}{11}{section.3}}
+\citation{strelkowa_clonal_2012}
+\citation{richman_rapid_2003}
+\citation{moore_limited_2009}
+\citation{strelkowa_clonal_2012}
 \bibstyle{natbib}
 \bibdata{bib}
 \bibcite{barat_interaction_1991}{{1}{1991}{{Barat {\em  et~al.}}}{{Barat, Grice, and Daelix}}}
-\@writefile{lof}{\contentsline {figure}{\numberline {1}{\ignorespaces Allele frequency trajectories of typical patient, C3-V5, nonsynonymous (solid) and synonymous mutations (dashed lines). Most synonymous mutations are not fixed. Colors are set according to the position of the site along the C3-V5 region (red to blue). Data from Ref.~\cite  {shankarappa_consistent_1999}.\relax }}{3}{figure.caption.1}}
-\providecommand*\caption@xref[2]{\@setref\relax\@undefined{#1}}
-\newlabel{fig:aft}{{1}{3}{Allele frequency trajectories of typical patient, C3-V5, nonsynonymous (solid) and synonymous mutations (dashed lines). Most synonymous mutations are not fixed. Colors are set according to the position of the site along the C3-V5 region (red to blue). Data from Ref.~\cite {shankarappa_consistent_1999}.\relax \relax }{figure.caption.1}{}}
-\@writefile{toc}{\contentsline {section}{\numberline {2}Results}{3}{section.2}}
 \bibcite{batorsky_estimate_2011}{{2}{2011}{{Batorsky {\em  et~al.}}}{{Batorsky, Kearney, Palmer, Maldarelli, Rouzine, and Coffin}}}
-\bibcite{bunnik_autologous_2008}{{3}{2008}{{Bunnik {\em  et~al.}}}{{Bunnik, Pisas, Van~Nuenen, and Schuitemaker}}}
-\bibcite{ewens_mathematical_2004}{{4}{2004}{{Ewens}}{{Ewens}}}
-\bibcite{fernandes_hiv-1_2012}{{5}{2012}{{Fernandes {\em  et~al.}}}{{Fernandes, Jayaraman, and Frankel}}}
-\bibcite{li_codon-usage-based_2012}{{6}{2012}{{Li {\em  et~al.}}}{{Li, Kao, Gao, Sandig, Limmer, Pavon-Eternod, Jones, Landry, Pan, Weitzman, and David}}}
-\bibcite{liu_selection_2006}{{7}{2006}{{Liu {\em  et~al.}}}{{Liu, {McNevin}, Cao, Zhao, Genowati, Wong, {McLaughlin}, {McSweyn}, Diem, Stevens, {\em  et~al.}}}}
-\bibcite{neher_recombination_2010}{{8}{2010}{{Neher and Leitner}}{{Neher and Leitner}}}
-\@writefile{lof}{\contentsline {figure}{\numberline {2}{\ignorespaces Fixation probability of derived synonymous alleles is strongly suppressed in C3-V5 versus other parts of the {\it  env} gene (left panel). Especially hard is fixation of new alleles in conserved regions flanking the V loops (right panel). The black dashed line is the prediction from neutral theory, for comparison purposes. Data from Refs.~\cite  {shankarappa_consistent_1999, bunnik_autologous_2008}.\relax }}{4}{figure.caption.2}}
-\@writefile{toc}{\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3}Discussion}{4}{section.3}}
-\@writefile{toc}{\contentsline {section}{\numberline {4}Methods}{4}{section.4}}
-\@writefile{lof}{\contentsline {figure}{\numberline {3}{\ignorespaces Fixation or extinction times for synonymous alleles starting from intermediate frequencies. The colored bands are the final fixation probabilities expected from neutral theory; the observed alleles are fixed less frequently than expected. The timescale of fixation/extinction is approximately 500 days, corresponding to a selective effect of $\sim -0.001$.\relax }}{5}{figure.caption.3}}
-\newlabel{fig:fixtimes}{{3}{5}{Fixation or extinction times for synonymous alleles starting from intermediate frequencies. The colored bands are the final fixation probabilities expected from neutral theory; the observed alleles are fixed less frequently than expected. The timescale of fixation/extinction is approximately 500 days, corresponding to a selective effect of $\sim -0.001$.\relax \relax }{figure.caption.3}{}}
-\@writefile{lof}{\contentsline {figure}{\numberline {4}{\ignorespaces Watts et al. have measured the reactivity of HIV nucleotides to {\it  in vitro} chemical attack and shown that some nucleotides are more likely to be involved in RNA secondary folds. C1-C5 regions, in particular, show conserved stem-loop structures~\citep  {watts_architecture_2009}. We show that among all derived alleles in those regions reaching frequencies of order one, there is a negative correlation between fixation and involvement in a base pairing in a RNA stem (left panel). The rest of the genome does not show any correlation (right panel). There might be too few silent polymorphisms in the first place, or the signal might be masked by a lot of non-functional RNA structures. Data from Refs.~\cite  {shankarappa_consistent_1999, bunnik_autologous_2008, liu_selection_2006}.\relax }}{6}{figure.caption.4}}
-\@writefile{lof}{\contentsline {figure}{\numberline {5}{\ignorespaces Simulations show that the suppression of fixation probability can be generated by linkage to sweeping nonsynonymous alleles nearby. Two possible scenarios are competition between escape mutants (left panel) and time-dependent selection due to immune sytem recognition (right panel).\relax }}{7}{figure.caption.5}}
-\@writefile{lof}{\contentsline {figure}{\numberline {6}{\ignorespaces Simulations on the escape competition scenario show that the density of selective sweeps and the size of the deleterious effects of synonymous mutations are the main driving forces of the phenomenon. A convex fixation probability is recovered, as seen in the data, along the diagonal (left panel): more dense sweeps can support more deleterious linked mutations. The density of sweeps is limited, however, by the nonsynonymous fixation probability, which is quite close to neutrality (right panel). Moreover, strong competition between escape mutants is required, so that several escape mutants are ``found'' by HIV within a few months of antibody production.\relax }}{7}{figure.caption.6}}
-\bibcite{ngumbela_quantitative_2008}{{9}{2008}{{Ngumbela {\em  et~al.}}}{{Ngumbela, Ryan, Sivamurthy, Brockman, Gandhi, Bhardwaj, and Kavanagh}}}
-\bibcite{paillart_vitro_2002}{{10}{2002}{{Paillart {\em  et~al.}}}{{Paillart, Skripkin, Ehresmann, Ehresmann, and Marquet}}}
-\bibcite{pantaleo_immunopathogenesis_1996}{{11}{1996}{{Pantaleo and Fauci}}{{Pantaleo and Fauci}}}
-\bibcite{shankarappa_consistent_1999}{{12}{1999}{{Shankarappa {\em  et~al.}}}{{Shankarappa, Margolick, Gange, Rodrigo, Upchurch, Farzadegan, Gupta, Rinaldo, Learn, He, {\em  et~al.}}}}
-\bibcite{watts_architecture_2009}{{13}{2009}{{Watts {\em  et~al.}}}{{Watts, Dang, Gorelick, Leonard, Jr, Swanstrom, Burch, and Weeks}}}
+\@writefile{toc}{\contentsline {section}{\numberline {4}Methods}{12}{section.4}}
+\bibcite{boltz_ultrasensitive_2012}{{3}{2012}{{Boltz {\em  et~al.}}}{{Boltz, Ambrose, Kearney, Shao, {KewalRamani}, Maldarelli, Mellors, and Coffin}}}
+\bibcite{brenner_high_2007}{{4}{2007}{{Brenner {\em  et~al.}}}{{Brenner, Roger, Routy, Moisi, Ntemgwa, Matte, Baril, Thomas, Rouleau, Bruneau, Leblanc, Legault, Tremblay, Charest, and Wainberg}}}
+\bibcite{bronson_nucleotide_1994}{{5}{1994}{{Bronson and Anderson}}{{Bronson and Anderson}}}
+\bibcite{bunnik_autologous_2008}{{6}{2008}{{Bunnik {\em  et~al.}}}{{Bunnik, Pisas, Van~Nuenen, and Schuitemaker}}}
+\bibcite{coleman_virus_2008}{{7}{2008}{{Coleman {\em  et~al.}}}{{Coleman, Papamichail, Skiena, Futcher, Wimmer, and Mueller}}}
+\bibcite{desai_beneficial_2007}{{8}{2007}{{Desai and Fisher}}{{Desai and Fisher}}}
+\bibcite{ewens_mathematical_2004}{{9}{2004}{{Ewens}}{{Ewens}}}
+\bibcite{fernandes_hiv-1_2012}{{10}{2012}{{Fernandes {\em  et~al.}}}{{Fernandes, Jayaraman, and Frankel}}}
+\bibcite{forsdyke_reciprocal_1995}{{11}{1995}{{Forsdyke}}{{Forsdyke}}}
+\bibcite{jenkins_extent_2003}{{12}{2003}{{Jenkins and Holmes}}{{Jenkins and Holmes}}}
+\bibcite{li_codon-usage-based_2012}{{13}{2012}{{Li {\em  et~al.}}}{{Li, Kao, Gao, Sandig, Limmer, Pavon-Eternod, Jones, Landry, Pan, Weitzman, and David}}}
+\bibcite{liu_selection_2006}{{14}{2006}{{Liu {\em  et~al.}}}{{Liu, {McNevin}, Cao, Zhao, Genowati, Wong, {McLaughlin}, {McSweyn}, Diem, Stevens, {\em  et~al.}}}}
+\bibcite{moore_limited_2009}{{15}{2009}{{Moore {\em  et~al.}}}{{Moore, Ranchobe, Lambson, Gray, Cave, Abrahams, Bandawe, Mlisana, Abdool~Karim, Williamson, Morris, the {CAPRISA} 002~study, and the {NIAID} Center~for {HIV/AIDS} Vaccine Immunology~{(CHAVI)}}}}
+\bibcite{neher_recombination_2010}{{16}{2010}{{Neher and Leitner}}{{Neher and Leitner}}}
+\bibcite{neher_genetic_2011}{{17}{2011}{{Neher and Shraiman}}{{Neher and Shraiman}}}
+\bibcite{ngumbela_quantitative_2008}{{18}{2008}{{Ngumbela {\em  et~al.}}}{{Ngumbela, Ryan, Sivamurthy, Brockman, Gandhi, Bhardwaj, and Kavanagh}}}
+\bibcite{paillart_vitro_2002}{{19}{2002}{{Paillart {\em  et~al.}}}{{Paillart, Skripkin, Ehresmann, Ehresmann, and Marquet}}}
+\bibcite{pantaleo_immunopathogenesis_1996}{{20}{1996}{{Pantaleo and Fauci}}{{Pantaleo and Fauci}}}
+\bibcite{perelson_hiv-1_1996}{{21}{1996}{{Perelson {\em  et~al.}}}{{Perelson, Neumann, Markowitz, Leonard, and Ho}}}
+\bibcite{richman_rapid_2003}{{22}{2003}{{Richman {\em  et~al.}}}{{Richman, Wrin, Little, and Petropoulos}}}
+\bibcite{sanjuan_interplay_2011}{{23}{2011}{{Sanjuan and Borderia}}{{Sanjuan and Borderia}}}
+\bibcite{shankarappa_consistent_1999}{{24}{1999}{{Shankarappa {\em  et~al.}}}{{Shankarappa, Margolick, Gange, Rodrigo, Upchurch, Farzadegan, Gupta, Rinaldo, Learn, He, {\em  et~al.}}}}
+\bibcite{strelkowa_clonal_2012}{{25}{2012}{{Strelkowa and Laessig}}{{Strelkowa and Laessig}}}
+\bibcite{watts_architecture_2009}{{26}{2009}{{Watts {\em  et~al.}}}{{Watts, Dang, Gorelick, Leonard, Jr, Swanstrom, Burch, and Weeks}}}
+\bibcite{zanini_ffpopsim:_2012}{{27}{2012}{{Zanini and Neher}}{{Zanini and Neher}}}
index c541da8..46b00ab 100644 (file)
@@ -16,6 +16,33 @@ Batorsky, R., Kearney, M.~F., Palmer, S.~E., Maldarelli, F., Rouzine, I.~M.,
 \newblock {\em Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United
   States of America\/}, {\bf 108}(14), 5661--6.
 
+\bibitem[Boltz {\em et~al.}(2012)Boltz, Ambrose, Kearney, Shao, {KewalRamani},
+  Maldarelli, Mellors, and Coffin]{boltz_ultrasensitive_2012}
+Boltz, V.~F., Ambrose, Z., Kearney, M.~F., Shao, W., {KewalRamani}, V.~N.,
+  Maldarelli, F., Mellors, J.~W., and Coffin, J.~M. (2012).
+\newblock Ultrasensitive allele-specific {PCR} reveals rare preexisting
+  drug-resistant variants and a large replicating virus population in macaques
+  infected with a simian immunodeficiency virus containing human
+  immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase.
+\newblock {\em Journal of Virology\/}, {\bf 86}(23), 12525--12530.
+
+\bibitem[Brenner {\em et~al.}(2007)Brenner, Roger, Routy, Moisi, Ntemgwa,
+  Matte, Baril, Thomas, Rouleau, Bruneau, Leblanc, Legault, Tremblay, Charest,
+  and Wainberg]{brenner_high_2007}
+Brenner, B.~G., Roger, M., Routy, J.-P., Moisi, D., Ntemgwa, M., Matte, C.,
+  Baril, J.-G., Thomas, R., Rouleau, D., Bruneau, J., Leblanc, R., Legault, M.,
+  Tremblay, C., Charest, H., and Wainberg, M.~A. (2007).
+\newblock High rates of forward transmission events after acute/early hiv-1
+  infection.
+\newblock {\em Journal of Infectious Diseases\/}, {\bf 195}(7), 951--959.
+
+\bibitem[Bronson and Anderson(1994)Bronson and
+  Anderson]{bronson_nucleotide_1994}
+Bronson, E.~C. and Anderson, J.~N. (1994).
+\newblock Nucleotide composition as a driving force in the evolution of
+  retroviruses.
+\newblock {\em Journal of Molecular Evolution\/}, {\bf 38}(5), 506--532.
+
 \bibitem[Bunnik {\em et~al.}(2008)Bunnik, Pisas, Van~Nuenen, and
   Schuitemaker]{bunnik_autologous_2008}
 Bunnik, E., Pisas, L., Van~Nuenen, A., and Schuitemaker, H. (2008).
@@ -24,6 +51,19 @@ Bunnik, E., Pisas, L., Van~Nuenen, A., and Schuitemaker, H. (2008).
   infection.
 \newblock {\em Journal of virology\/}, {\bf 82}(16), 7932.
 
+\bibitem[Coleman {\em et~al.}(2008)Coleman, Papamichail, Skiena, Futcher,
+  Wimmer, and Mueller]{coleman_virus_2008}
+Coleman, J.~R., Papamichail, D., Skiena, S., Futcher, B., Wimmer, E., and
+  Mueller, S. (2008).
+\newblock Virus attenuation by genome-scale changes in codon pair bias.
+\newblock {\em Science\/}, {\bf 320}(5884), 1784--1787.
+
+\bibitem[Desai and Fisher(2007)Desai and Fisher]{desai_beneficial_2007}
+Desai, M.~M. and Fisher, D.~S. (2007).
+\newblock Beneficial mutation selection balance and the effect of linkage on
+  positive selection.
+\newblock {\em Genetics\/}, {\bf 176}(3), 1759--98.
+
 \bibitem[Ewens(2004)Ewens]{ewens_mathematical_2004}
 Ewens, W.~J. (2004).
 \newblock {\em Mathematical Population Genetics: I. Theoretical
@@ -37,6 +77,18 @@ Fernandes, J., Jayaraman, B., and Frankel, A. (2012).
   cooperative assembly of a homo-oligomeric ribonucleoprotein complex.
 \newblock {\em {RNA} Biology\/}, {\bf 9}(1), 4--9.
 
+\bibitem[Forsdyke(1995)Forsdyke]{forsdyke_reciprocal_1995}
+Forsdyke, D. (1995).
+\newblock Reciprocal relationship between stem-loop potential and substitution
+  density in retroviral quasispecies under positive darwinian selection.
+\newblock {\em Journal of Molecular Evolution\/}, {\bf 41}(6).
+
+\bibitem[Jenkins and Holmes(2003)Jenkins and Holmes]{jenkins_extent_2003}
+Jenkins, G.~M. and Holmes, E.~C. (2003).
+\newblock The extent of codon usage bias in human {RNA} viruses and its
+  evolutionary origin.
+\newblock {\em Virus Research\/}, {\bf 92}(1), 1--7.
+
 \bibitem[Li {\em et~al.}(2012)Li, Kao, Gao, Sandig, Limmer, Pavon-Eternod,
   Jones, Landry, Pan, Weitzman, and David]{li_codon-usage-based_2012}
 Li, M., Kao, E., Gao, X., Sandig, H., Limmer, K., Pavon-Eternod, M., Jones,
@@ -53,12 +105,30 @@ Liu, Y., {McNevin}, J., Cao, J., Zhao, H., Genowati, I., Wong, K.,
   following primary infection.
 \newblock {\em Journal of virology\/}, {\bf 80}(19), 9519.
 
+\bibitem[Moore {\em et~al.}(2009)Moore, Ranchobe, Lambson, Gray, Cave,
+  Abrahams, Bandawe, Mlisana, Abdool~Karim, Williamson, Morris, the {CAPRISA}
+  002~study, and the {NIAID} Center~for {HIV/AIDS} Vaccine
+  Immunology~{(CHAVI)}]{moore_limited_2009}
+Moore, P.~L., Ranchobe, N., Lambson, B.~E., Gray, E.~S., Cave, E., Abrahams,
+  M.-R., Bandawe, G., Mlisana, K., Abdool~Karim, S.~S., Williamson, C., Morris,
+  L., the {CAPRISA} 002~study, and the {NIAID} Center~for {HIV/AIDS} Vaccine
+  Immunology~{(CHAVI)} (2009).
+\newblock Limited neutralizing antibody specificities drive neutralization
+  escape in early hiv-1 subtype c infection.
+\newblock {\em PLoS Pathog\/}, {\bf 5}(9), e1000598.
+
 \bibitem[Neher and Leitner(2010)Neher and Leitner]{neher_recombination_2010}
 Neher, R. and Leitner, T. (2010).
 \newblock Recombination rate and selection strength in {HIV} intra-patient
   evolution.
 \newblock {\em {PLoS} Comput Biol\/}, {\bf 6}(1), e1000660.
 
+\bibitem[Neher and Shraiman(2011)Neher and Shraiman]{neher_genetic_2011}
+Neher, R.~A. and Shraiman, B. (2011).
+\newblock Genetic draft and quasi-neutrality in large facultatively sexual
+  populations.
+\newblock {\em Genetics\/}, {\bf 188}(4), 975--996.
+
 \bibitem[Ngumbela {\em et~al.}(2008)Ngumbela, Ryan, Sivamurthy, Brockman,
   Gandhi, Bhardwaj, and Kavanagh]{ngumbela_quantitative_2008}
 Ngumbela, K.~C., Ryan, K.~P., Sivamurthy, R., Brockman, M.~A., Gandhi, R.~T.,
@@ -82,6 +152,28 @@ Pantaleo, G. and Fauci, A.~S. (1996).
 \newblock {\em Annual Review of Microbiology\/}, {\bf 50}(1), 825--854.
 \newblock {PMID:} 8905100.
 
+\bibitem[Perelson {\em et~al.}(1996)Perelson, Neumann, Markowitz, Leonard, and
+  Ho]{perelson_hiv-1_1996}
+Perelson, a.~S., Neumann, a.~U., Markowitz, M., Leonard, J.~M., and Ho, D.~D.
+  (1996).
+\newblock Hiv-1 dynamics in vivo: virion clearance rate, infected cell
+  life-span, and viral generation time.
+\newblock {\em Science {(New York, N.Y.)}\/}, {\bf 271}(5255), 1582--6.
+
+\bibitem[Richman {\em et~al.}(2003)Richman, Wrin, Little, and
+  Petropoulos]{richman_rapid_2003}
+Richman, D.~D., Wrin, T., Little, S.~J., and Petropoulos, C.~J. (2003).
+\newblock Rapid evolution of the neutralizing antibody response to {HIV} type 1
+  infection.
+\newblock {\em Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences\/}, {\bf
+  100}(7), 4144--4149.
+
+\bibitem[Sanjuan and Borderia(2011)Sanjuan and
+  Borderia]{sanjuan_interplay_2011}
+Sanjuan, R. and Borderia, A.~V. (2011).
+\newblock Interplay between rna structure and protein evolution in hiv-1.
+\newblock {\em Molecular Biology and Evolution\/}, {\bf 28}(4), 1333--1338.
+
 \bibitem[Shankarappa {\em et~al.}(1999)Shankarappa, Margolick, Gange, Rodrigo,
   Upchurch, Farzadegan, Gupta, Rinaldo, Learn, He, {\em
   et~al.}]{shankarappa_consistent_1999}
@@ -92,6 +184,12 @@ Shankarappa, R., Margolick, J., Gange, S., Rodrigo, A., Upchurch, D.,
   of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.
 \newblock {\em Journal of Virology\/}, {\bf 73}(12), 10489.
 
+\bibitem[Strelkowa and Laessig(2012)Strelkowa and
+  Laessig]{strelkowa_clonal_2012}
+Strelkowa, N. and Laessig, M. (2012).
+\newblock Clonal interference in the evolution of influenza.
+\newblock {\em Genetics\/}.
+
 \bibitem[Watts {\em et~al.}(2009)Watts, Dang, Gorelick, Leonard, Jr, Swanstrom,
   Burch, and Weeks]{watts_architecture_2009}
 Watts, J.~M., Dang, K.~K., Gorelick, R.~J., Leonard, C.~W., Jr, J. W.~B.,
@@ -100,4 +198,10 @@ Watts, J.~M., Dang, K.~K., Gorelick, R.~J., Leonard, C.~W., Jr, J. W.~B.,
   genome.
 \newblock {\em Nature\/}, {\bf 460}(7256), 711--716.
 
+\bibitem[Zanini and Neher(2012)Zanini and Neher]{zanini_ffpopsim:_2012}
+Zanini, F. and Neher, R.~A. (2012).
+\newblock {FFPopSim:} an efficient forward simulation package for the evolution
+  of large populations.
+\newblock {\em Bioinformatics\/}.
+
 \end{thebibliography}
index de05b24..d0540dc 100644 (file)
@@ -3,44 +3,44 @@ Capacity: max_strings=35307, hash_size=35307, hash_prime=30011
 The top-level auxiliary file: synmut.aux
 The style file: natbib.bst
 Database file #1: bib.bib
-You've used 13 entries,
+You've used 27 entries,
             2378 wiz_defined-function locations,
-            613 strings with 7412 characters,
-and the built_in function-call counts, 7327 in all, are:
-= -- 618
-> -- 569
-< -- 3
-+ -- 175
-- -- 173
-* -- 773
-:= -- 1319
-add.period$ -- 67
-call.type$ -- 13
-change.case$ -- 79
-chr.to.int$ -- 13
-cite$ -- 13
-duplicate$ -- 260
-empty$ -- 414
-format.name$ -- 190
-if$ -- 1394
+            696 strings with 10738 characters,
+and the built_in function-call counts, 14916 in all, are:
+= -- 1307
+> -- 1100
+< -- 11
++ -- 336
+- -- 332
+* -- 1530
+:= -- 2660
+add.period$ -- 129
+call.type$ -- 27
+change.case$ -- 170
+chr.to.int$ -- 27
+cite$ -- 27
+duplicate$ -- 521
+empty$ -- 859
+format.name$ -- 377
+if$ -- 2860
 int.to.chr$ -- 1
 int.to.str$ -- 0
-missing$ -- 14
-newline$ -- 69
-num.names$ -- 52
-pop$ -- 81
+missing$ -- 28
+newline$ -- 139
+num.names$ -- 108
+pop$ -- 162
 preamble$ -- 1
-purify$ -- 80
+purify$ -- 171
 quote$ -- 0
-skip$ -- 160
+skip$ -- 343
 stack$ -- 0
-substring$ -- 404
-swap$ -- 51
+substring$ -- 883
+swap$ -- 97
 text.length$ -- 0
 text.prefix$ -- 0
 top$ -- 0
-type$ -- 114
+type$ -- 240
 warning$ -- 0
-while$ -- 56
+while$ -- 119
 width$ -- 0
-write$ -- 171
+write$ -- 351
index 2c84bb0..ce8585e 100644 (file)
@@ -1,20 +1,20 @@
 # Fdb version 3
-["bibtex synmut"] 1354156520 "synmut.aux" "synmut.bbl" "synmut" 1354156521
+["bibtex synmut"] 1354413444 "synmut.aux" "synmut.bbl" "synmut" 1354413446
   "./natbib.bst" 1354038822 26224 f3907cf5bef1f44c8c15558e94274a18 ""
-  "bib.bib" 1354155571 34852 c61332a3d143bd66fe6704a32e2c0f68 ""
-  "synmut.aux" 1354156521 7956 2d9a1056571fb1bd199eabe08c4fe5cd ""
+  "bib.bib" 1354410964 16501 61bf7942fb957de40cba189019b01236 ""
+  "synmut.aux" 1354413445 13210 b6dd7a00c57e5e62cf896b5c352cde2c ""
   "synmut.bcf" 0 -1 0 ""
   (generated)
   "synmut.blg"
   "synmut.bbl"
-["pdflatex"] 1354156520 "synmut.tex" "synmut.pdf" "synmut" 1354156521
-  "./figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf" 1354052151 46925 cb77fd4d3c620a7f88d5746364a9637b ""
+["pdflatex"] 1354413444 "synmut.tex" "synmut.pdf" "synmut" 1354413446
+  "./figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf" 1354394656 46615 d9f2e6238685d3c5f6a3bba75cd8f350 ""
   "./figures/Shankarappa_allele_freqs_trajectories_syn_nonsynp8.png" 1354051829 609794 c75e87d7bceb9d4b7191cac1e986e252 ""
   "./figures/Shankarappa_fix_loss_dt_times.pdf" 1354144424 38777 e7bbedec0c1981e77fac39828ddcec3d ""
   "./figures/Shankarappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf" 1354052181 44554 3804bf7b3b4035a0b016ec470814af9e ""
   "./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_heat.pdf" 1354061909 180089 a8b64eeb397ba1703384c3ce4a5e4105 ""
   "./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_nonsyn_heat.pdf" 1354061959 180847 799c88edb7c9667d188edf0ccd430087 ""
-  "./figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredients_3rddel_envnonenv_stopall.pdf" 1354053241 40809 4b8487f0b28c9f00da582b973529f5e7 ""
+  "./figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredients_3rddel_envnonenv_stopall.pdf" 1354394125 35210 5d07f96bf15ecad7d871bb0225ebf734 ""
   "./figures/fixation_probability_shortgenome_N_1e4_epitopes_example_longer.pdf" 1354053122 48732 f0b6d5bf2b86bc7f3fd8baf7ca4fdbda ""
   "./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_Vandflanking_fromSHAPE.pdf" 1354052621 28455 12b9e43eb3c5c8d2d4ff56b02ee13705 ""
   "./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_nonVandflanking.pdf" 1354060219 25778 a6e328f0f59a50c5a54ccab5d7401d34 ""
   "/usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/public/cm/cmr12.tfm" 1340779279 1288 655e228510b4c2a1abe905c368440826 ""
   "/usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/public/cm/cmsy10.tfm" 1340779279 1124 6c73e740cf17375f03eec0ee63599741 ""
   "/usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/public/amsfonts/cm/cmmi10.pfb" 1340779285 36299 5f9df58c2139e7edcf37c8fca4bd384d ""
+  "/usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/public/amsfonts/cm/cmr10.pfb" 1340779285 35752 024fb6c41858982481f6968b5fc26508 ""
   "/usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/public/amsfonts/cm/cmsy10.pfb" 1340779285 32569 5e5ddc8df908dea60932f3c484a54c0d ""
   "/usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/helvetic/uhvb8a.pfb" 1340779286 35941 f27169cc74234d5bd5e4cca5abafaabb ""
+  "/usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/symbol/usyr.pfb" 1340779286 33709 b09d2e140b7e807d3a97058263ab6693 ""
   "/usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/times/utmb8a.pfb" 1340779286 44729 811d6c62865936705a31c797a1d5dada ""
   "/usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/times/utmr8a.pfb" 1340779286 46026 6dab18b61c907687b520c72847215a68 ""
   "/usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/times/utmri8a.pfb" 1340779286 45458 a3faba884469519614ca56ba5f6b1de1 ""
   "/usr/share/texmf/web2c/texmf.cnf" 1323553176 29610 220a4f4cc0d915bf8fcbcb553dcee1ae ""
   "/var/lib/texmf/fonts/map/pdftex/updmap/pdftex.map" 1342967191 326961 cf80ba444933a36c4d9a5002f7be7a39 ""
   "/var/lib/texmf/web2c/pdftex/pdflatex.fmt" 1350750671 6913479 ccda3616f0d7fcfbd4c90b17826e237e ""
-  "figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf" 1354052151 46925 cb77fd4d3c620a7f88d5746364a9637b ""
+  "figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf" 1354394656 46615 d9f2e6238685d3c5f6a3bba75cd8f350 ""
   "figures/Shankarappa_allele_freqs_trajectories_syn_nonsynp8.png" 1354051829 609794 c75e87d7bceb9d4b7191cac1e986e252 ""
   "figures/Shankarappa_fix_loss_dt_times.pdf" 1354144424 38777 e7bbedec0c1981e77fac39828ddcec3d ""
   "figures/Shankarappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf" 1354052181 44554 3804bf7b3b4035a0b016ec470814af9e ""
   "figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_heat.pdf" 1354061909 180089 a8b64eeb397ba1703384c3ce4a5e4105 ""
   "figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_nonsyn_heat.pdf" 1354061959 180847 799c88edb7c9667d188edf0ccd430087 ""
-  "figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredients_3rddel_envnonenv_stopall.pdf" 1354053241 40809 4b8487f0b28c9f00da582b973529f5e7 ""
+  "figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredients_3rddel_envnonenv_stopall.pdf" 1354394125 35210 5d07f96bf15ecad7d871bb0225ebf734 ""
   "figures/fixation_probability_shortgenome_N_1e4_epitopes_example_longer.pdf" 1354053122 48732 f0b6d5bf2b86bc7f3fd8baf7ca4fdbda ""
   "figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_Vandflanking_fromSHAPE.pdf" 1354052621 28455 12b9e43eb3c5c8d2d4ff56b02ee13705 ""
   "figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_nonVandflanking.pdf" 1354060219 25778 a6e328f0f59a50c5a54ccab5d7401d34 ""
   "natbib.sty" 1354038822 35030 e8af73603d5c055d67faa3405f72c6f0 ""
-  "synmut.aux" 1354156521 7956 2d9a1056571fb1bd199eabe08c4fe5cd ""
-  "synmut.bbl" 1354156520 4951 171e6f77f2d4efbd28f60914846760be "bibtex synmut"
-  "synmut.out" 1354156521 176 01739b3027fa53cd7e63bda39599bb37 ""
-  "synmut.tex" 1354156517 12684 c9bc379d379d2c6e2a6981d91aeabf3e ""
+  "synmut.aux" 1354413445 13210 b6dd7a00c57e5e62cf896b5c352cde2c ""
+  "synmut.bbl" 1354413444 9992 be4d374f0a8a827f4ad1fe87eeb22222 "bibtex synmut"
+  "synmut.out" 1354413445 176 01739b3027fa53cd7e63bda39599bb37 ""
+  "synmut.tex" 1354413441 32546 3f97a11a7ac2435fe959abe3b5d95851 ""
   (generated)
   "synmut.out"
   "synmut.pdf"
index 301ce56..67dc1d3 100644 (file)
@@ -217,11 +217,18 @@ INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/times/ptmr7t.vf
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/times/ptmr8r.tfm
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/times/ptmri7t.vf
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/times/ptmri8r.tfm
-INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/times/zptmcmr.vf
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/times/zptmcmrm.vf
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/symbol/psyr.tfm
-INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/public/cm/cmr10.tfm
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/public/cm/cmmi10.tfm
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/times/zptmcmrm.vf
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/symbol/psyr.tfm
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/times/ptmri8r.tfm
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/public/cm/cmmi10.tfm
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/times/zpzccmry.vf
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/public/cm/cmsy10.tfm
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/zapfchan/pzcmi8r.tfm
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/times/zptmcmr.vf
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/public/cm/cmr10.tfm
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/times/ptmr7t.tfm
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/times/ptmr7t.tfm
 INPUT ./figures/Shankarappa_allele_freqs_trajectories_syn_nonsynp8.png
@@ -231,18 +238,19 @@ INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/helvetic/phvr7t.tfm
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/helvetic/phvb7t.tfm
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/times/ptmr7t.vf
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/times/ptmr8r.tfm
-INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/times/zpzccmry.vf
-INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/public/cm/cmsy10.tfm
-INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/zapfchan/pzcmi8r.tfm
 INPUT ./figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf
 INPUT ./figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf
 INPUT ./figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf
 INPUT ./figures/Shankarappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf
 INPUT ./figures/Shankarappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf
 INPUT ./figures/Shankarappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/helvetic/phvb7t.vf
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/helvetic/phvb8r.tfm
 INPUT ./figures/Shankarappa_fix_loss_dt_times.pdf
 INPUT ./figures/Shankarappa_fix_loss_dt_times.pdf
 INPUT ./figures/Shankarappa_fix_loss_dt_times.pdf
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/times/zptmcmr.vf
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/public/cm/cmr10.tfm
 INPUT ./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_Vandflanking_fromSHAPE.pdf
 INPUT ./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_Vandflanking_fromSHAPE.pdf
 INPUT ./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_Vandflanking_fromSHAPE.pdf
@@ -261,10 +269,11 @@ INPUT ./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi
 INPUT ./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_nonsyn_heat.pdf
 INPUT ./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_nonsyn_heat.pdf
 INPUT ./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_nonsyn_heat.pdf
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/times/zpzccmry.vf
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/public/cm/cmsy10.tfm
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/zapfchan/pzcmi8r.tfm
 INPUT synmut.bbl
 INPUT synmut.bbl
-INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/helvetic/phvb7t.vf
-INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/helvetic/phvb8r.tfm
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/times/ptmr7t.vf
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/tfm/adobe/times/ptmr8r.tfm
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/adobe/times/ptmri7t.vf
@@ -291,8 +300,10 @@ INPUT ./synmut.out
 INPUT ./synmut.out
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/enc/dvips/base/8r.enc
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/public/amsfonts/cm/cmmi10.pfb
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/public/amsfonts/cm/cmr10.pfb
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/public/amsfonts/cm/cmsy10.pfb
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/helvetic/uhvb8a.pfb
+INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/symbol/usyr.pfb
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/times/utmb8a.pfb
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/times/utmr8a.pfb
 INPUT /usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/times/utmri8a.pfb
index 797f5a1..a2047d6 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-This is pdfTeX, Version 3.1415926-2.4-1.40.13 (TeX Live 2012/Arch Linux) (format=pdflatex 2012.10.20)  28 NOV 2012 18:35
+This is pdfTeX, Version 3.1415926-2.4-1.40.13 (TeX Live 2012/Arch Linux) (format=pdflatex 2012.10.20)  1 DEC 2012 17:57
 entering extended mode
  restricted \write18 enabled.
  %&-line parsing enabled.
@@ -435,13 +435,13 @@ LaTeX Font Info:    Font shape `OT1/ptm/bx/n' in size <8> not available
 LaTeX Font Info:    Font shape `OT1/ptm/bx/n' in size <6> not available
 (Font)              Font shape `OT1/ptm/b/n' tried instead on input line 56.
 LaTeX Font Info:    Font shape `OT1/ptm/bx/n' in size <17.28> not available
-(Font)              Font shape `OT1/ptm/b/n' tried instead on input line 65.
+(Font)              Font shape `OT1/ptm/b/n' tried instead on input line 81.
 LaTeX Font Info:    Font shape `OT1/ptm/bx/n' in size <12> not available
-(Font)              Font shape `OT1/ptm/b/n' tried instead on input line 79.
+(Font)              Font shape `OT1/ptm/b/n' tried instead on input line 93.
 LaTeX Font Info:    Font shape `OT1/ptm/bx/n' in size <9> not available
-(Font)              Font shape `OT1/ptm/b/n' tried instead on input line 79.
+(Font)              Font shape `OT1/ptm/b/n' tried instead on input line 93.
 LaTeX Font Info:    Font shape `OT1/ptm/bx/n' in size <7> not available
-(Font)              Font shape `OT1/ptm/b/n' tried instead on input line 79.
+(Font)              Font shape `OT1/ptm/b/n' tried instead on input line 93.
 [1
 
 {/var/lib/texmf/fonts/map/pdftex/updmap/pdftex.map}]
@@ -451,167 +451,163 @@ File: ./figures/Shankarappa_allele_freqs_trajectories_syn_nonsynp8.png Graphic
 file (type png)
 <use ./figures/Shankarappa_allele_freqs_trajectories_syn_nonsynp8.png>
 Package pdftex.def Info: ./figures/Shankarappa_allele_freqs_trajectories_syn_no
-nsynp8.png used on input line 138.
+nsynp8.png used on input line 153.
 (pdftex.def)             Requested size: 390.0pt x 257.05147pt.
 LaTeX Font Info:    Font shape `OT1/phv/m/n' will be
-(Font)              scaled to size 9.85492pt on input line 142.
+(Font)              scaled to size 9.85492pt on input line 157.
 LaTeX Font Info:    Font shape `OT1/phv/bx/n' in size <10.95> not available
-(Font)              Font shape `OT1/phv/b/n' tried instead on input line 142.
+(Font)              Font shape `OT1/phv/b/n' tried instead on input line 157.
 LaTeX Font Info:    Font shape `OT1/phv/b/n' will be
-(Font)              scaled to size 9.85492pt on input line 142.
+(Font)              scaled to size 9.85492pt on input line 157.
 [2]
-<./figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf, id=83, 578.16pt x 433.62p
+<./figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf, id=88, 578.16pt x 433.62p
 t>
 File: ./figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf Graphic file (type pd
 f)
 <use ./figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf>
 Package pdftex.def Info: ./figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf us
-ed on input line 150.
+ed on input line 179.
 (pdftex.def)             Requested size: 191.10214pt x 143.32661pt.
-<./figures/Shankarappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf, id=84, 578.16pt x 433.62pt>
+<./figures/Shankarappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf, id=89, 578.16pt x 433.62pt>
 File: ./figures/Shankarappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf Graphic file (type pdf)
 <use ./figures/Shankarappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf>
 Package pdftex.def Info: ./figures/Shankarappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf used on
- input line 151.
+ input line 180.
 (pdftex.def)             Requested size: 191.10214pt x 143.32661pt.
-<./figures/Shankarappa_fix_loss_dt_times.pdf, id=93, 578.16pt x 433.62pt>
+[3 <./figures/Shankarappa_allele_freqs_trajectories_syn_nonsynp8.png>] <./figur
+es/Shankarappa_fix_loss_dt_times.pdf, id=118, 578.16pt x 433.62pt>
 File: ./figures/Shankarappa_fix_loss_dt_times.pdf Graphic file (type pdf)
 <use ./figures/Shankarappa_fix_loss_dt_times.pdf>
 Package pdftex.def Info: ./figures/Shankarappa_fix_loss_dt_times.pdf used on in
-put line 164.
+put line 217.
 (pdftex.def)             Requested size: 390.0pt x 292.4956pt.
+[4 <./figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf> <./figures/Shankarappa
+_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf
 
+pdfTeX warning: pdflatex (file ./figures/Shankarappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf):
+ PDF inclusion: multiple pdfs with page group included in a single page
+>] [5 <./figures/Shankarappa_fix_loss_dt_times.pdf>]
 <./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_Vandflanking_fr
-omSHAPE.pdf, id=94, 578.16pt x 433.62pt>
+omSHAPE.pdf, id=423, 578.16pt x 433.62pt>
 File: ./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_Vandflanki
 ng_fromSHAPE.pdf Graphic file (type pdf)
 
 <use ./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_Vandflankin
 g_fromSHAPE.pdf>
 Package pdftex.def Info: ./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_re
-activity_Vandflanking_fromSHAPE.pdf used on input line 176.
+activity_Vandflanking_fromSHAPE.pdf used on input line 280.
 (pdftex.def)             Requested size: 191.10214pt x 143.32661pt.
 
 <./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_nonVandflanking
-.pdf, id=95, 578.16pt x 433.62pt>
+.pdf, id=424, 578.16pt x 433.62pt>
 File: ./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_nonVandfla
 nking.pdf Graphic file (type pdf)
 
 <use ./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_nonVandflan
 king.pdf>
 Package pdftex.def Info: ./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_re
-activity_nonVandflanking.pdf used on input line 177.
+activity_nonVandflanking.pdf used on input line 281.
 (pdftex.def)             Requested size: 191.10214pt x 143.32661pt.
+[6] [7 <./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_Vandflan
+king_fromSHAPE.pdf> <./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reacti
+vity_nonVandflanking.pdf
 
+pdfTeX warning: pdflatex (file ./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixat
+ion_reactivity_nonVandflanking.pdf): PDF inclusion: multiple pdfs with page gro
+up included in a single page
+>]
 <./figures/fixation_probability_shortgenome_N_1e4_epitopes_example_longer.pdf, 
-id=112, 650.43pt x 505.89pt>
+id=504, 650.43pt x 505.89pt>
 File: ./figures/fixation_probability_shortgenome_N_1e4_epitopes_example_longer.
 pdf Graphic file (type pdf)
 
 <use ./figures/fixation_probability_shortgenome_N_1e4_epitopes_example_longer.p
 df>
 Package pdftex.def Info: ./figures/fixation_probability_shortgenome_N_1e4_epito
-pes_example_longer.pdf used on input line 205.
+pes_example_longer.pdf used on input line 349.
 (pdftex.def)             Requested size: 191.10214pt x 148.63414pt.
 
 <./figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredients_3rddel_envnonenv_stopall.pdf
-, id=113, 609.78046pt x 614.295pt>
+, id=505, 518.00227pt x 391.32913pt>
 File: ./figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredients_3rddel_envnonenv_stopal
 l.pdf Graphic file (type pdf)
 
 <use ./figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredients_3rddel_envnonenv_stopall
 .pdf>
 Package pdftex.def Info: ./figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredients_3rdd
-el_envnonenv_stopall.pdf used on input line 206.
-(pdftex.def)             Requested size: 191.10214pt x 192.51973pt.
+el_envnonenv_stopall.pdf used on input line 350.
+(pdftex.def)             Requested size: 191.10214pt x 144.36555pt.
 
 <./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_h
-eat.pdf, id=114, 642.4pt x 292.05519pt>
+eat.pdf, id=508, 642.4pt x 292.05519pt>
 File: ./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescep
 i_6_heat.pdf Graphic file (type pdf)
 
 <use ./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi
 _6_heat.pdf>
 Package pdftex.def Info: ./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_
-eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_heat.pdf used on input line 216.
+eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_heat.pdf used on input line 382.
 (pdftex.def)             Requested size: 191.10214pt x 86.88193pt.
 
 <./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_n
-onsyn_heat.pdf, id=115, 642.4pt x 292.05519pt>
+onsyn_heat.pdf, id=509, 642.4pt x 292.05519pt>
 File: ./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescep
 i_6_nonsyn_heat.pdf Graphic file (type pdf)
 
 <use ./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi
 _6_nonsyn_heat.pdf>
 Package pdftex.def Info: ./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_
-eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_nonsyn_heat.pdf used on input line 217.
+eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_nonsyn_heat.pdf used on input line 383.
 (pdftex.def)             Requested size: 191.10214pt x 86.88193pt.
-(./synmut.bbl [3 <./figures/Shankarappa_allele_freqs_trajectories_syn_nonsynp8.
-png>] [4 <./figures/Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka.pdf> <./figures/Shank
-arappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf
-
-pdfTeX warning: pdflatex (file ./figures/Shankarappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions.pdf):
- PDF inclusion: multiple pdfs with page group included in a single page
->] [5 <./figures/Shankarappa_fix_loss_dt_times.pdf>] [6 <./figures/mixed_Shanka
-rappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_Vandflanking_fromSHAPE.pdf> <./figures
-/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_nonVandflanking.pdf
-
-pdfTeX warning: pdflatex (file ./figures/mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixat
-ion_reactivity_nonVandflanking.pdf): PDF inclusion: multiple pdfs with page gro
-up included in a single page
->] [7 <./figures/fixation_probability_shortgenome_N_1e4_epitopes_example_longer
-.pdf> <./figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredients_3rddel_envnonenv_stopa
-ll.pdf
+[8] [9 <./figures/fixation_probability_shortgenome_N_1e4_epitopes_example_longe
+r.pdf> <./figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredients_3rddel_envnonenv_stop
+all.pdf
 
 pdfTeX warning: pdflatex (file ./figures/fixation_probability_N_1e4_3ingredient
 s_3rddel_envnonenv_stopall.pdf): PDF inclusion: multiple pdfs with page group i
 ncluded in a single page
-> <./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6
-_heat.pdf
-
-pdfTeX warning: pdflatex (file ./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_fra
-c_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_heat.pdf): PDF inclusion: multiple pdfs with page 
-group included in a single page
-> <./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6
-_nonsyn_heat.pdf
+>] [10 <./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nesc
+epi_6_heat.pdf> <./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_
+0_01_nescepi_6_nonsyn_heat.pdf
 
 pdfTeX warning: pdflatex (file ./figures/fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_fra
 c_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_nonsyn_heat.pdf): PDF inclusion: multiple pdfs wit
 h page group included in a single page
->] (/usr/share/texmf-dist/tex/latex/ucs/data/uni-32.def
+>] [11] (./synmut.bbl [12] (/usr/share/texmf-dist/tex/latex/ucs/data/uni-32.def
 File: uni-32.def 2012/04/20 UCS: Unicode data U+2000..U+20FF
 )
 LaTeX Font Info:    Font shape `OT1/ptm/bx/n' in size <5> not available
-(Font)              Font shape `OT1/ptm/b/n' tried instead on input line 75.
-)
-Package atveryend Info: Empty hook `BeforeClearDocument' on input line 240.
-[8]
-Package atveryend Info: Empty hook `AfterLastShipout' on input line 240.
+(Font)              Font shape `OT1/ptm/b/n' tried instead on input line 145.
+[13])
+Package atveryend Info: Empty hook `BeforeClearDocument' on input line 519.
+[14]
+Package atveryend Info: Empty hook `AfterLastShipout' on input line 519.
 (./synmut.aux)
-Package atveryend Info: Executing hook `AtVeryEndDocument' on input line 240.
-Package atveryend Info: Executing hook `AtEndAfterFileList' on input line 240.
+Package atveryend Info: Executing hook `AtVeryEndDocument' on input line 519.
+Package atveryend Info: Executing hook `AtEndAfterFileList' on input line 519.
 Package rerunfilecheck Info: File `synmut.out' has not changed.
 (rerunfilecheck)             Checksum: 01739B3027FA53CD7E63BDA39599BB37;176.
-Package atveryend Info: Empty hook `AtVeryVeryEnd' on input line 240.
+Package atveryend Info: Empty hook `AtVeryVeryEnd' on input line 519.
  ) 
 Here is how much of TeX's memory you used:
- 8584 strings out of 493488
- 128513 string characters out of 3146891
- 227207 words of memory out of 3000000
- 11688 multiletter control sequences out of 15000+200000
- 54855 words of font info for 116 fonts, out of 3000000 for 9000
+ 8629 strings out of 493488
+ 129318 string characters out of 3146891
+ 231025 words of memory out of 3000000
+ 11707 multiletter control sequences out of 15000+200000
+ 58093 words of font info for 122 fonts, out of 3000000 for 9000
  957 hyphenation exceptions out of 8191
- 44i,7n,46p,924b,466s stack positions out of 5000i,500n,10000p,200000b,50000s
+ 44i,8n,46p,915b,499s stack positions out of 5000i,500n,10000p,200000b,50000s
 {/usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/enc/dvips/base/8r.enc}</usr/share/texmf-dist/fon
 ts/type1/public/amsfonts/cm/cmmi10.pfb></usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/publi
-c/amsfonts/cm/cmsy10.pfb></usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/helvetic/uhvb8a
-.pfb></usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/times/utmb8a.pfb></usr/share/texmf-
-dist/fonts/type1/urw/times/utmr8a.pfb></usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/ti
-mes/utmri8a.pfb>
-Output written on synmut.pdf (8 pages, 1099291 bytes).
+c/amsfonts/cm/cmr10.pfb></usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/public/amsfonts/cm/c
+msy10.pfb></usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/helvetic/uhvb8a.pfb></usr/shar
+e/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/symbol/usyr.pfb></usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1
+/urw/times/utmb8a.pfb></usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/times/utmr8a.pfb><
+/usr/share/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/urw/times/utmri8a.pfb>
+Output written on synmut.pdf (14 pages, 1128781 bytes).
 PDF statistics:
- 2325 PDF objects out of 2487 (max. 8388607)
- 1565 compressed objects within 16 object streams
42 named destinations out of 1000 (max. 500000)
+ 2448 PDF objects out of 2487 (max. 8388607)
+ 1684 compressed objects within 17 object streams
62 named destinations out of 1000 (max. 500000)
  83 words of extra memory for PDF output out of 10000 (max. 10000000)
 
diff --git a/synmut.pdf b/synmut.pdf
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index b2ee3e0..0000000
Binary files a/synmut.pdf and /dev/null differ
index 04a18bc..77cb49b 100644 (file)
@@ -60,73 +60,88 @@ concerned, we detect a negative correlation between fixation of an allele and
 its involvement in evolutionarily conserved RNA stem-loop structures.
 This phenonenon is not observed in other parts of the HIV genome, in which
 selective sweeps are less dense and the genetic architecture less constrained.
+%In absence of antiretroviral treatment, HIV is very successful at producing
+%mutants that are able to stay undetected by the host immune system for months,
+%boosting the infection~\citep{richman_rapid_2003, bunnik_autologous_2008,
+%moore_limited_2009}. The high mutation rate at the core of this process,
+%however, also generates genetic noise in the background of beneficial alleles.
+%Because of the limited ourcrossing of HIV, hitchhikers usually stay linked to
+%the focal allele for a time comparable to its sweeping time, i.e. a few
+%months~\citep{neher_recombination_2010, batorsky_estimate_2011}. The later fate
+%of these accessory mutations depends more and more, as they decouple genetically
+%from the escape allele via recombination, on their own fitness effects. In this
+%study we show that, in a genetic region particularly dense of selective sweeps,
+%synonymous hitchhikers tend to revert on a time scale of the order of 500 days,
+%because of their deleterious fitness effects. In addition, we provide evidence
+%that the biological origin for this deleterious effects resides, at least
+%partially, in the disruption of macroevolutionarily conserved RNA secondary
+%structures, termed ``insulating stems''.
 \end{abstract}
 
 \section{Introduction}
 
 HIV evolves rapidly within a single host during the course of the infection. The
 driving forces shaping this process are the high mutation rate and the strong
-selection imposed by the host immune system via a wealth of mechanisms, notably
-killer T cells (CTLs) and neutralizing
-antibodies~\citep{pantaleo_immunopathogenesis_1996}.
-
-In a nutshell, when the host develops a CTL or antibody respose against a
-particular viral epitope, rare HIV variants carrying mutated versions of the
-epitope, called {\it escape mutants}, acquire a fitness advantage and spread
-rapidly in the viral population, within a few months (see
-\figurename~\ref{fig:aft}, solid lines). During chronic infection, the
-(Malthusian) effect size of this beneficial mutations is of the order of
-$0.01$~\citep{neher_recombination_2010}. The viral \env{} gene shows the fastest
-rates of adaptation, because is both rich of CTL epitopes and targeted by
-antibodies; its sequence diverges at rates of the order of $1\%$ per
-year~\citep{shankarappa_consistent_1999}.
-
-Many nucleotide polymorphisms are escape mutations, and in particular are
-nonsynonymous, i.e. they appear in protein coding regions and change the amino
-acid sequence. Nonetheless, nucleotide changes unrelated to immune escape are
-seen, in \env{} and elsewhere, and some of them become abundant alike, often
-rapidly. In particular, it is not uncommon for synonymous mutations to reach
-frequencies of order one within months from their first appearance (see
-\figurename~\ref{fig:aft}, dashed lines). The biological function of these
-mutations in the economy of HIV is not well understood. By definition, the
-immunological phenotype, which is decided at the protein level, is unaffected,
-but other biological and ecological aspects of the viral lifestyle might be
-involved. In practice, a couple of RNA-level phenotypes are
-known. For example, within \env{} a certain RNA sequence, called \rev{}
-response element (RRE), is used by HIV to enhance nuclear export of some of its
-transcripts~\citep{fernandes_hiv-1_2012}. Another case is the interaction
-between viral reverse transcriptase, viral ssRNA, and the host
-tRNA$^\text{Lys3}$: the latter is required for priming viral replication and
-bound by a specifical pseudoknotted RNA structure in the viral 5' untranslated
-region~\citep{barat_interaction_1991, paillart_vitro_2002}.
-
-Crucially for evolutionary studies, the minor phenotypes caused by synonymous
+selection imposed by the host immune system via killer T cells (CTLs) and
+neutralizing antibodies (AB)~\citep{pantaleo_immunopathogenesis_1996}.
+
+When the host develops a CTL or AB respose against a particular viral epitope,
+rare HIV variants carrying mutated versions of the epitope, called {\it escape
+mutants}, acquire a fitness advantage and spread rapidly in the viral
+population, within a few months (see \figurename~\ref{fig:aft}, solid lines).
+During chronic infection, the (Malthusian) effect size of this beneficial
+mutations is of the order of $s_e \sim 0.01$~\citep{neher_recombination_2010}.
+The viral \env{} gene shows the fastest rates of adaptation, because is both
+rich of CTL epitopes and targeted by antibodies; its sequence diverges at rates
+of the order of $1\%$ per year~\citep{shankarappa_consistent_1999}.
+
+Many nucleotide polymorphisms that reach high frequency in the viral population
+are escape mutations: all of them are {\it nonsynonymous} (i.e. they appear in
+protein coding regions and change the amino acid sequence). Nonetheless,
+nucleotide changes unrelated to immune escape are not rare, in \env{} and
+elsewhere, and some of them become abundant alike, often rapidly. In particular,
+it is not uncommon for {\it synonymous} mutations to reach frequencies of order
+one within months from their first appearance (see \figurename~\ref{fig:aft},
+dashed lines). The biological function of these mutations within the economy of
+HIV is not well understood. By definition, the immunological phenotype, which is
+decided at the protein level, is unaffected, but other biological and ecological
+aspects of the viral lifestyle might be involved. In practice, a couple of
+RNA-level phenotypes are known. For example, within \env{} a certain RNA
+sequence, called \rev{} response element (RRE), is used by HIV to enhance
+nuclear export of some of its transcripts~\citep{fernandes_hiv-1_2012}. Another
+well studied case is the interaction between viral reverse transcriptase, viral
+ssRNA, and the host tRNA$^\text{Lys3}$: the latter is required for priming
+reverse transcription (RT) and bound by a specifical pseudoknotted RNA structure
+in the viral 5' untranslated region~\citep{barat_interaction_1991,
+paillart_vitro_2002}.
+
+Crucially for evolutionary purposes, the minor phenotypes caused by synonymous
 mutations might have an effect on viral fitness. For instance, recent studies
 have shown that genetically engineered HIV strains with skewed codon usage bias
 (CUB) patterns towards more or less abundant tRNAs replicate better or worse,
-respectively~\citep{ngumbela_quantitative_2008, li_codon-usage-based_2012}.
-In this study, we try to characterize the fitness effects of synonymous
-polymorphisms that, at some point during the infection, become abundant in the
-viral population.
+respectively~\citep{ngumbela_quantitative_2008, li_codon-usage-based_2012}. In
+this study, we try to characterize the fitness effects of synonymous
+polymorphisms that, at some point during chronic infection, become abundant in
+the viral population.
 
 One simple way to assess the neutrality of synonymous mutations is to look at
 their level of conservation. Deleterious mutations at functional sites are
 expected to be absent or rare across the viral population; vice versa, mutant
-alleles that reach high frequencies are expected to be neutral. Confirmatorily,
-population genetics shows that the equilibrium frequency of a deleterious allele
-with fitness $-s$ is $\mut / |s|$, where $\mut$ is the mutation rate per site
-per generation; neutral alleles have no equilibrium frequency and can slowly fix
-via genetic drift~\citep{ewens_mathematical_2004}. This approach, albeit
-intuitive, works only under the assumption of independent sites. If the focal
-synonymous mutant is linked to another, nonneutral allele, its frequency is the
-result of the combined fitness effects of both sites. Since recombination in HIV
-is known to be rather rare~\citep{neher_recombination_2010,
-batorsky_estimate_2011}, the genetic context of the synonymous change at hand
-must be taken into account.
-
+alleles that reach high frequencies are expected to be neutral. If genetic sites
+are independent, the equilibrium frequency of a deleterious allele with fitness
+$-s$ is $\mut / |s|$, where $\mut$ is the mutation rate per site per generation;
+neutral alleles have no equilibrium frequency and can slowly fix via genetic
+drift~\citep{ewens_mathematical_2004}. If the focal synonymous mutant is linked
+to another nonneutral allele, however, its frequency is the result of the
+combined fitness effects of both sites, and simple conservation-level analyses
+fail. Since recombination in HIV is known to happen
+rarely~\citep{neher_recombination_2010, batorsky_estimate_2011}, the genetic
+context of the synonymous change at hand must be taken into account. Our
+results underline the importance of the latter scenario for intrapatient HIV
+evolution.
 
 \section{Results}
-We start from time series of viral nucleotide sequences from single patients,
+We analyze from time series of viral nucleotide sequences from single patients,
 which span several years of chronic
 infection~\citep{shankarappa_consistent_1999, bunnik_autologous_2008,
 liu_selection_2006}. Plotting the allele frequencies against time for all
@@ -143,63 +158,192 @@ region (red to blue). Data from Ref.~\cite{shankarappa_consistent_1999}.}
 \label{fig:aft}
 \end{center}
 \end{figure}
+Moreover, many mutations appear to change rapidly in frequency as a flock,
+especially at the lower end of the frequency spectrum. These observations lead
+to the idea that linkage might be widespread at the time scale of the typical
+selective sweep, i.e. a few months~\citep{neher_recombination_2010}. It seems
+therefore likely that synonymous mutations are not attaining high frequencies by
+genetic drift but are rather exponentially amplified by selection on linked
+nonsynonymous sites, a process known as {\it genetic
+draft}~\citep{neher_genetic_2011}.
 
-
+To test this hypothesis, we focus on the long-time fate of such synonymous
+derived alleles {\it after} they are already abundant. According to the neutral
+theory of independent sites, (a) an allele starting at frequency $\nu$ will
+reach fixation, in the long-time limit, with a probability $P_f(\nu) = \nu$, and
+get extinct otherwise; (b) the time required to reach either boundary, fixation
+or extinction, is essentialy the inverse of the population size (in
+generations), hence much longer than five years for HIV~\citep{boltz_ultrasensitive_2012}.
 \begin{figure}
 \begin{center}
 \subfloat{\includegraphics[width=0.49\linewidth]{Bunnik2008_fixmid_syn_ShankanonShanka}}
 \subfloat{\includegraphics[width=0.49\linewidth]{Shankarappa_fixmid_syn_V_regions}}
-\caption{Fixation probability of derived synonymous alleles is strongly
-suppressed in C3-V5 versus other parts of the {\it env} gene (left panel).
-Especially hard is fixation of new alleles in conserved regions flanking the V
-loops (right panel). The black dashed line is the prediction from neutral
+\caption{Left panel: fixation probability of derived synonymous alleles is strongly
+suppressed in C3-V5 versus other parts of the {\it env} gene, and of
+nonsynonymous ones.
+Right panel: especially hard is fixation of new alleles in conserved regions flanking the V
+loops. The black dashed line is the prediction from neutral
 theory, for comparison purposes. Data from
 Refs.~\cite{shankarappa_consistent_1999, bunnik_autologous_2008}.}
+\label{fig:fixp}
 \end{center}
 \end{figure}
 
+The left panel of \figurename~\ref{fig:fixp} shows the fixation probability of
+derived alleles seen within various frequency windows. With regard to synonymous
+alleles, the average over the whole HIV genome (organce line) matches closely
+the expected result from neutral theory (dashed line). A different picture
+emerges when the most variable part of the genome, V1-C5 region of \env{},
+is zoomed into (red line). Two independent datasets, from
+refs.~\citep{shankarappa_consistent_1999, bunnik_autologous_2008} yield the same
+result, i.e. that synonymous mutations hardly fix at all.
 
+A related observation can be made on the nonsynonymous alleles (blue line).
+Although we see no difference between different parts of the HIV genome, the
+neutral-like shape of $P_f$ is at odds with the na\"ive expectation that most
+nonsynonymous alleles reaching high frequency are to-be-fixed escape mutations.
+
+Moreover, as illustrated in \figurename~\ref{fig:fixtimes}, the time for
+synonymous alleles to reach the first boundary starting from intermediate
+frequencies is of the order of 500 days which, assuming a conservative
+generation time of one day~\citep{perelson_hiv-1_1996}, correspond to the same
+number of generations. This time would only be possible in a neutral scenario
+if the population size of HIV were extremely small, of the order of $10^3$, much
+smaller then both theory and experiments
+indicate~\citep{boltz_ultrasensitive_2012}.
+% WE SHOULD REALLY CITE OURSELVES IN THE (HOPEFUL) FUTURE HERE :-)
 \begin{figure}
 \begin{center}
 \includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{Shankarappa_fix_loss_dt_times}
 \caption{Fixation or extinction times for synonymous alleles starting from
-intermediate frequencies. The colored bands are the final fixation probabilities
-expected from neutral theory; the observed alleles are fixed less frequently
-than expected. The timescale of fixation/extinction is approximately 500 days,
-corresponding to a selective effect of $\sim -0.001$.}
+intermediate frequencies. The colored bands are the final fixation
+probabilities expected from neutral theory; the observed alleles are fixed
+less frequently than expected. The timescale of fixation/extinction is
+approximately 500 days, corresponding to a selective effect of $\sim -0.001$.}
 \label{fig:fixtimes}
 \end{center}
 \end{figure}
 
+Taken together, these findings suggest that synonymous (and some nonsynonymous)
+alleles are not propagating independently by genetic drift, but rather
+hitchhiking on neighbouring beneficial alleles. This conclusion is also
+consistent with the currently accepted estimate for the outcrossing rate of HIV,
+of the order of $1\%$ per generation. Although synonymous alleles can be drafted
+to high frequency by linkage and selection, they decouple on a time scale of the
+order of 100 days, which is also the average time it takes a (nonsynonymous)
+selected allele to spread through the population during chronic
+infection~\citep{neher_recombination_2010}.
+
+\figurename~\ref{fig:fixp} (left panel) also suggests that at least some
+synonymous mutations in the V1-C5 region should be deleterious. We analyze this
+hypothesis in two ways. First of all, we look for possible biological causes for
+such a behaviour. Furthermore, we perform computer simulations of viral
+evolution under a wide range of parameters in order to reproduce the results for
+the fixation probability and study the regions of the parameter space compatible
+with the observations.
+
+One possible {\it a priori} explanation for deleterious fitness effects of
+synonymous mutations is the presence of secondary structures in the viral RNA.
+If any RNA secondary structures are functionally relevant for HIV replication,
+mutations in nucleotides involved in those base pairs are expected to revert
+more easily than by pure chance, to keep those structures in place. The
+propensity of nucleotides to form base pairs in HIV has been measured
+recently\citep{watts_architecture_2009}, and the HIV genome has resulted to be
+highly structured~\citep{forsdyke_reciprocal_1995, watts_architecture_2009}.
+Watts {\it et al.} have measured the propensity of any nucleoside to be attacked by
+external chemicals (SHAPE reactivity) and shown that a higher reactivity
+corresponds to a smaller likelihood of being involved in an RNA helix. As far as
+the V1-C5 region is concerned, it has been shown that the short C1-5 regions
+have a high tendency to form {\it insulating
+stems}~\citep{watts_architecture_2009, sanjuan_interplay_2011}. Since the V1-5
+loops have to be highly variable to ensure immune escape, their destabilizing
+contribution to the viral RNA structure is though to be buffered by the
+surrounding, base-pair rich stems. To test whether or not insulating stems might
+be the reason for the reduced fixation probability, we partition the data
+depending on their position in the V1-C5 region. Consistently with the
+expectations, $P_f$ is more heavily readuced in the stems than in
+the loops (see \figurename~\ref{fig:fixp}, right panel).
+
+Despite this indirect result supporting the involvement of RNA secondary
+structure in the deleterious effects of synonymous mutations in V1-C5, we set
+out to seek more direct evidence. We partition all synonymous alleles observed
+at intermediate frequencies above 10-15\% depending on their final destiny
+(fixation or extinction). Subsequently, we align our sequences to the reference
+NL4-3 strain used in ref.~\citep{watts_architecture_2009} and assign them SHAPE
+reactivities. As shown in \figurename~\ref{fig:SHAPE} (left panel) in a
+cumulative histogram, the reactivity of fixed alleles are systematically larger
+than of alleles that are doomed to extinction. In other words, alleles that are
+likely to be breaking RNA helices are also more likely to revert and finally be
+lost from the population.
 \begin{figure}
 \begin{center}
 \subfloat{\includegraphics[width=0.49\linewidth]{mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_Vandflanking_fromSHAPE}}
 \subfloat{\includegraphics[width=0.49\linewidth]{mixed_Shankarappa_Bunnik2008_Liu_fixation_reactivity_nonVandflanking}}
-\caption{Watts et al. have measured the reactivity of HIV nucleotides to {\it in
-vitro} chemical attack and shown that some nucleotides are more likely to be
-involved in RNA secondary folds. C1-C5 regions, in particular, show conserved
-stem-loop structures~\citep{watts_architecture_2009}. We show that among all
-derived alleles in those regions reaching frequencies of order one, there is a negative
-correlation between fixation and involvement in a base pairing in a RNA stem
-(left panel). The rest of the genome does not show any correlation (right
-panel). There might be too few silent polymorphisms in the first place, or the
-signal might be masked by a lot of non-functional RNA structures. Data from
-Refs.~\cite{shankarappa_consistent_1999, bunnik_autologous_2008,
-liu_selection_2006}.}
+\caption{Watts et al. have measured the reactivity of HIV nucleotides to {\it
+in vitro} chemical attack and shown that some nucleotides are more likely to
+be involved in RNA secondary folds. C1-C5 regions, in particular, show
+conserved stem-loop structures~\citep{watts_architecture_2009}. We show that
+among all derived alleles in those regions reaching frequencies of order one,
+there is a negative correlation between fixation and involvement in a base
+pairing in a RNA stem (left panel). The rest of the genome does not show any
+correlation (right panel). There might be too few silent polymorphisms in the
+first place, or the signal might be masked by non-functional RNA
+structures. Data from Refs.~\cite{shankarappa_consistent_1999,
+bunnik_autologous_2008, liu_selection_2006}.}
+\label{fig:SHAPE}
 \end{center}
 \end{figure}
 
-%\begin{figure}
-%\begin{center}
-%\subfloat{\includegraphics[width=0.49\linewidth]{Henn_density_polymorphisms}}
-%\subfloat{\includegraphics[width=0.49\linewidth]{Henn_density_polymorphisms_syn_over_chances}}
-%\caption{The total density of polymorphisms (mostly nonsynonymous ones) is
-%highest in the V regions (left panel). The density of synonymous mutations only,
-%however, is not enriched there (right panel). This could be due to a more
-%deleterious effect of synonymous mutations.}
-%\end{center}
-%\end{figure}
+Since the insulating stems are not the only RNA secondary structures found by
+the authors of ref.~\citep{watts_architecture_2009}, we repeated the same
+partitioning based on fate on the rest of the HIV genome. As shown in the right
+panel of \figurename~\ref{fig:SHAPE}, there is no evidence that a similar
+mechanism is acting outside of the V1-C5 region. This is not fully surprising,
+because it is well known that single stranded RNA chains tend to form a lot of
+spontaneous structures, most of which have no biological function. Furthermore,
+the averaging over many different genomic regions might worsen the
+signal-to-noise ratio, which is already quite low, and result in
+indistinguishable histograms.
+
+In addition to RNA secondary structure, we have considered other possible
+explanations for a fitness effect of synonymous mutations, in particular codon
+usage bias (CUB). HIV is known to prefer A-rich codons over highly expressed
+human housekeeping genes~\citep{jenkins_extent_2003}. Moreover, codon-optimized
+and -pessimized viruses have recently been generated and shown to replicate
+better or worse than wild type strains,
+respectively~\citep{li_codon-usage-based_2012, ngumbela_quantitative_2008,
+coleman_virus_2008}. We do not found, however, evidence for any contribution of
+CUB to the ultimate fate of synonymous alleles. Several lines of thought support
+this result. First of all, although codon-optimized HIV seems to perform better
+{\it in vitro}, the distance in CUB between HIV and human genes is not shrinking
+at the macroevolutionary level. Second, within a single patient, we do not
+observe any bias towards more human-like CUB in the synonymous mutations that
+reach fixation rather than extinction. Third, it is a common phenomenon for
+retroviruses to use variously different codons from their hosts, and CUB effects
+on fitness are thought to be so small that divergent nucleotide composition has
+been suggested as a possible mechanism for viral
+speciation~\citep{bronson_nucleotide_1994}. Fourth, CUB in the V1-C5 region is
+not very different from other parts of the HIV genome, whereas the reduced
+fixation probability is only observed there. In conclusion, although we cannot
+exclude an effect of CUB on fitness as a general rule, we expect it to be a
+minor effect in our context.
 
+We also perform computer simulations of evolving viral population under
+selection and rare recombination. For this purpose, we use the recently
+published package FFPopSim, which includes a module dedicated to intrapatient
+HIV evolution~\citep{zanini_ffpopsim:_2012}. We analyze many combination of
+parameters such as population size, recombination rate, selection coefficient
+and density of escape mutations, epitope length, deleterious effect of
+synonymous mutations. The purpose of the simulations is to probe the population
+genetics mechanisms required to reproduce the fixation probabilities of
+\figurename~\ref{fig:fixp}, simultaneously for synonymous and nonsynonymous
+alleles.
+
+The main result of the simulations is that genetic draft can indeed generate a
+depression in fixation probabilities, but only under relatively tight
+circumstances. In terms of model confidence, this is a good result: the
+probability of obtaining the experimental curves by pure chance is negligible.
+\figurename~\ref{fig:simfixp} shows two instances of successful simulations.
 \begin{figure}
 \begin{center}
 \subfloat{\includegraphics[width=0.49\linewidth]{fixation_probability_shortgenome_N_1e4_epitopes_example_longer}}
@@ -208,14 +352,35 @@ liu_selection_2006}.}
 generated by linkage to sweeping nonsynonymous alleles nearby. Two possible
 scenarios are competition between escape mutants (left panel) and time-dependent
 selection due to immune sytem recognition (right panel).}
+\label{fig:simfixp}
 \end{center}
 \end{figure}
 
+First of all, in order for $P_f$ to be reduced to levels seen in the data, most
+synonymous mutants habe to be slightly deleterious. The reason is that if
+synonymous alleles are an even mixture of deleterious and neutral ones, the
+latter are much more likely to be carried to high frequencies by genetic draft,
+because they present no burden to escape mutations. The synonymous $P_f$ is then
+dominated by these neutral alleles and the depression induced by the few
+deleterious ones becomes undetectable.
+
+Furthermore, the two crucial parameters that control the fixation probability
+are the following: (a) the deleterious effects of hitchhikers compared to
+the beneficial effects of escape mutants, and (b) the density of escape
+mutations. Intuitively, a higher density of escape mutations (i.e., epitopes)
+enables a larger degree of genetic draft, because escape mutations start to
+combine and their effects add up. In \figurename~\ref{fig:simheat} (left panel),
+we show that this is indeed the case in simulations. For any combination of
+parameters, we get a curve like those shown in \figurename~\ref{fig:simfixp} and
+we measure the area between the curve and the diagonal (neutral prediction). An
+area around 0.20 to 0.35 correspond to a concave curve; an area of 0.45 means no
+genetic draft at all; an area of 0 means a neutral-like fixation probability.
+The data-like parameter region that produces concave $P_f$ curves is roughly
+marked by the ellipse and confirms the aforementioned intuitive expectation.
 \begin{figure}
 \begin{center}
 \subfloat{\includegraphics[width=0.49\linewidth]{fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_heat.pdf}}
 \subfloat{\includegraphics[width=0.49\linewidth]{fixation_loss_shortgenome_area_ada_frac_del_eff_coi_0_01_nescepi_6_nonsyn_heat.pdf}}
-
 \caption{Simulations on the escape competition scenario show that the density of
  selective sweeps and the size of the deleterious effects of synonymous
  mutations are the main driving forces of the phenomenon. A convex fixation
@@ -225,13 +390,127 @@ selection due to immune sytem recognition (right panel).}
  quite close to neutrality (right panel). Moreover, strong competition between
  escape mutants is required, so that several escape mutants are ``found'' by HIV
 within a few months of antibody production.}
-
+\label{fig:simheat}
 \end{center}
 \end{figure}
 
+Third, the effects of more dense escape mutations also affects the fixation
+probability of {\it nonsynonymous} alleles. In real data, among all
+nonsynonymous changes, there is no way to distinguish {\it a priori} between
+escape mutations and hitchhikers. The fixation probability of nonsynonymous
+derived alleles is an average over both, weighted by their abundances at the
+starting frequency. In case of denser epitopes, this average is enriched in
+escape mutations, most of which are destined to fix as soon as they reach their
+establishment frequency $s/N \ll 0.1$~\citep{desai_beneficial_2007}. The
+measured $P_f$ for nonsynonymous alleles in HIV is, however, in hardly any
+excess above the neutral line (see \figurename~\ref{fig:fixp}, blue line). In
+order to reconcile simulations with data on this point, several requirements
+have to be met. First of all, the density of epitopes has to be fairly small,
+lest they dominate the average and cause a strong rise in $P_f$. The parameter
+region compatible with the data is indicated in the right panel of
+\figurename~\ref{fig:simheat} with a circle in the top-left corner,
+corresponding to deleterious effects of synonymous changes of roughly $-0.001$.
+
+Moreover, even at the smallest epitope densities for which genetic draft is
+still effective, it is still much more likely for an escape mutation to both
+reach a high frequency and subsequently fix, compared to a nonsynonymous
+hitchhiker. In HIV, however, as shown in \figurename~\ref{fig:fixtimes}, it is
+quite common for a nonsynonymous mutation (solid lines) to reach majority quicky
+and yet eventually get extinct. This conundrum is suggestive of an active
+mechanism, in real HIV infections, for decreasing the fitness of escape mutants
+over time. We test two possible such mechamisms that are biologically plausible
+and find some evidence in the clinical literature: time-dependent selection and
+within-epitope competition. The former concept refers to the possibility that
+the host immune system slowly recognizes the escape mutants and, by deploying
+its countermeasures (antibodies and killer T cells), reduces its fitness during
+a selective sweep, dooming it to extinction despite the initial quick rise in
+frequency. An example for the fixation probabilities generated by this kind of
+models is shown in \figurename~\ref{fig:simfixp} (right panel). This scenario
+finds some backing in the clinical literature: an antibody response to escape
+mutants is indeed present; the delay of this response compared to appearance of
+the escape mutation, a few months, matches the average sweep time of an escape
+mutant. It is therefore not unlikely that the immune system catch the mutant
+during the sweep and neutralize it before fixation~\citep{richman_rapid_2003,
+bunnik_autologous_2008}. The alternative scenario, however, namely
+within-epitope competition, is also valid. The basic idea is that, since the
+mutation rate of HIV is high, several different escape mutations can be seeded
+at the same time and start to spread. Their fitness benefits are not additive,
+because each of them is essentially sufficient to warrant invisibility to the
+host immune system (e.g. to suppress antibody binding). As a consequence, the
+fastest allele to establish is most likely to reach fixation; later escape
+mutants can still reach frequencies of order one because they initially only
+replace wild type viruses; they are eventually swept away by the more abundant,
+early established mutant. This kind of epistatic interactions within epitopes is
+proven able to reduce fixation probabilities in simulations
+(\figurename~\ref{fig:simfixp}, left panel). Furthermore, the emergence of
+multiple sweeping nonsynonymous mutations in real HIV infections has been shown
+previously~\citep{moore_limited_2009}.
+
 \section{Discussion}
+In the HIV research community, synonymous changes have been known for a long
+time to have potential fitness effects, for instance via the RRE element or the
+priming of RT via tRNA$^\text{Lys3}$~\citep{fernandes_hiv-1_2012,
+paillart_vitro_2002}. Despite the large {\it corpus} of biochemical studies on
+these phenomena, the evolutionary significance of nonneutral synonymous changes
+reimains to be assessed. In this study, we show that, in the epitope-rich V1-C5
+\env{} region, synonymous changes with deleterious effects are actively lost
+during the course of the infection. Note that, although most of these alleles
+are indeed rare at the population level, i.e. across HIV-infected subjects, that
+fact alone is not sufficient to infer fitness effects, because of the
+confounding effect of phylogeny. Conversely, the positive correlation between
+intrapatient extinction and interpatient rarity implies, on the light of our
+findings, that these alleles should be constantly depleted from the pool of
+circulating HIV strains by natural selection. A mechanistic insight into this
+process is not trivial, however, because the time scale of the intrapatient
+depletion is long, $s^{-1} \sim 10^3~\text{days}$, whereas transmission is
+thought to happen mostly during early infection~\citep{brenner_high_2007}.
+
+With respect to the correlation with RNA seconary structure, functional
+significance of the insulating stems has been proposed
+previously~\citep{watts_architecture_2009, sanjuan_interplay_2011}, but its
+direct microevolutionary consequences are less clear. Our analysis is akin to
+that in ref.~\citep{sanjuan_interplay_2011} in terms of overall goals, but
+provides direct evidence that insulating stems are relevant for viral fitness
+{\it in vivo}. In absence of clear-cut biochemical experiments, our results
+confirm the hypothesis that insulating stems might be needed to organize the
+viral RNA during packaging in such a way as to avoid unwanted structures caused
+by mutations in the hypervariable loops. In addition, although the fitness
+effects involved are quite small (ten times smaller than the typical benefit of
+an escape mutation), the consistency across unrelated patients makes these stems
+an attractive potential target for therapeutic drugs. Unfortunately, our
+approach yields a rather weak, if locally highly significant, signal. Whether or
+not similar RNA secondary structures are present in other regions of the genome
+remains largely an unanswered question, although we do not find evidence in this
+sense. 
+
+As far as population genetics models are concerned, our study uncovers the
+subtle balance of evolutionary forces governing intrapatient HIV evolution. The
+fixation and extinction times and probabilities represent a rich and simple
+summary statistics to test sequencing data and computer simulation upon, as
+noted independently in ref.~\citep{strelkowa_clonal_2012} in the context of
+influenza. Furthermore, our results emphasize the inadequacy of independent-site
+models of HIV evolution, especially in the light of transient effects on
+sweeping sites, such as time-dependent selection and within-epitope negative
+epistasis. Although a final word about which of these mechanisms is more
+widespread is yet to be spoken, both intuition and biological evidence from the
+literature support a mixed scenario~\citep{richman_rapid_2003,
+moore_limited_2009}. Note also that, unlike influenza, HIV does recombine if
+rarely, hence clonal interference as studied in
+ref.~\citep{strelkowa_clonal_2012} is only a short-term effect. In conclusion,
+we regard two consequences of this state of affairs as particularly relevant for
+clinical purposes. On the one hand, the intervention of the host immune system
+appears, if late, effective in fighting escape mutants, so that an active
+stimulation of the host immune systems towards a more prompt response might be a
+viable treatment route. On the other hand, if HIV is indeed able to generate
+several escape mutants at the same time, as both data and calculations seem to
+indicate, an early response against some of them might not suffice to control
+the viral load.
+
 \section{Methods}
+\comment{to be written\dots}
 \section*{Acknowledgements}
+\comment{to be written\dots}
+
 
 %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
 \bibliographystyle{natbib}